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Australian tourists warned to avoid Bali nightclubs after attacks

Australians holidaying in Bali have been warned to steer clear of beach parties after 30 people were killed in ISIS terror attacks since Sunday.

The fresh warning follows a string of terror attacks on police officers and several Christian Churches across Indonesia this week.

Indonesia Institute president Ross Taylor urged Australians to take the terror threat seriously, and avoid congregating in large groups.  

Australians holidaying in Bali have been warned to steer clear of beach parties after 30 people were killed in ISIS terror attacks since Sunday (two Australian women at Finns Beach Club) 

Buildings and cars are on fire after a bomb blast in tourist site of Kuta, Bali 13 October 2002

Buildings and cars are on fire after a bomb blast in tourist site of Kuta, Bali 13 October 2002

Indonesian police bail water from a cater formed by a car bomb explosion in hopes of finding any evidence in the popular tourist area of Kuta in Denpasar, on the Indonesian island of Bali, 13 October 2002 after a huge car bomb ripped through two bars

Indonesian police bail water from a cater formed by a car bomb explosion in hopes of finding any evidence in the popular tourist area of Kuta in Denpasar, on the Indonesian island of Bali, 13 October 2002 after a huge car bomb ripped through two bars

‘Drunken Aussies out in public could be potentially dangerous,’ he told The West on Thursday.

‘I would suggest young people avoid major nightclubs during this time and have a great holiday but act respectfully and sensibly at all times.’

The warning comes as a reminder of twin bombs in Bali which killed 202 people and injured more than 240 others on the island. 

The 2002 bombing, which killed 88 Australians, was Asia’s deadliest terror strike.

The suicide bombers from an al-Qaida linked group targeted popular bars including Sari Club and Paddy’s Pub in Kuta on October 2002.

Now 16 years later, the Indonesian island has again been rocked by a spate of terror attacks putting tourists’ lives at risk.

Indonesia Institute president Ross Taylor urged Australians to take the terror threat seriously, and avoid congregating in large groups (tourists holidaying in Bali this week) 

Indonesia Institute president Ross Taylor urged Australians to take the terror threat seriously, and avoid congregating in large groups (tourists holidaying in Bali this week) 

The bodies of two attackers who were shot and killed are seen at the entrance of a police station in Pekanbaru, Indonesia on Wednesday after the station was attacked by suspected militants 

The bodies of two attackers who were shot and killed are seen at the entrance of a police station in Pekanbaru, Indonesia on Wednesday after the station was attacked by suspected militants 

Police remove the bodies of attackers who were shot and killed at the entrance of the station   (pictured)

Police remove the bodies of attackers who were shot and killed at the entrance of the station   (pictured)

Indonesian policemen examine a car used by attackers outside the police headquarter in Pekanbaru, Riau

Indonesian policemen examine a car used by attackers outside the police headquarter in Pekanbaru, Riau

On Wednesday, suspected militants slammed a minivan into a gate at Pekanbaru Police Station on the Indonesian island of Sumatra before attacking officers with swords.

On Monday members of another family blew themselves up at a police station in the city, wounding 10.

‘There were five people on two motorbikes. One of them was a little kid,’ national police chief Tito Karnavian said.

‘This is one family.’

On Monday, members of another family blew themselves up at a police station in the city, wounding 10

On Monday, members of another family blew themselves up at a police station in the city, wounding 10

'There were five people on two motorbikes. One of them was a little kid,' national police chief Tito Karnavian said. 'This is one family.'

‘There were five people on two motorbikes. One of them was a little kid,’ national police chief Tito Karnavian said. ‘This is one family.’

An eight-year-old girl from the family survived the attack and was taken to hospital, while her mother, father and two brothers died in the blast, he said.

On Sunday, a family of six – including girls aged nine and 12 – staged suicide bombings of three churches during morning services in Surabaya, killing 18 including the bombers.

The spate of bombings have rocked Indonesia, with the Islamic State group claiming the church attacks and raising fears about its influence in Southeast Asia as its dreams of a Middle Eastern caliphate fade.

Firefighters tried to extinguish a blaze following a blast at the Pentecost Church in central Surabaya after suicide bombers attacked three churches 

Firefighters tried to extinguish a blaze following a blast at the Pentecost Church in central Surabaya after suicide bombers attacked three churches 

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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