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Australia’s cheapest home is a CAVE that comes with running water and electricity for just $14,000

Australia’s cheapest home is a CAVE: Inside the underground hovel that comes with running water and electricity – and it’s on the market for just $14,000

  • Australia’s cheapest home is a cave equipped with water and electricity
  • The unconventional property located in a rural town is on sale for just $14,000
  • The man-made cave is 32 times cheaper than the average Australian home 

Australia’s cheapest home – a cave equipped with water and electricity – is on the market for just $14,000. 

The man-made cave is situated in the opal mining town of White Cliffs, in the northeast of New South Wales. 

The home listed on realestate.com.au is 32 times cheaper than the average New South Wales property. 

Australia’s cheapest property listed as a home is a cave and is on the market for only $14,000

The man-made cave in rural New South Wales is 32 times cheaper than the average home in the state 

The man-made cave in rural New South Wales is 32 times cheaper than the average home in the state 

The unconventional home will require some hard labour to become a liveable property.  

The cave has been marketed as an opportunity to ‘create your own underground home’. 

Listing information claims the home is a ‘rare’ chance to live in ‘one of the richest opal producing fields’.  

But the future owner will have to dig deep to find traces of the valuable stone. 

Listing information claims the home is a 'rare' chance to live in 'one of the richest opal producing fields'

Listing information claims the home is a ‘rare’ chance to live in ‘one of the richest opal producing fields’

The property is ideal for miners as the town boasts of mining opportunities in the industry. 

‘You can’t mine opal anymore but you can dig yourself another room and if you happen to find something you’ll be lucky,’ said the current owner. 

The current owner was in the middle of expanding the current tunnels but has stopped after he moved into a complete dugout.  

A majority of residents living in the rural town also live in underground properties known as dugouts. 

Many of the dugouts in White Cliffs were once mining tunnels and have been transformed into fully functioning bathrooms, kitchens and bedrooms.  

The Outback town is home to roughly 150-200 people and is known to be friendly and hospitable close-knit community, the listing states. 

A majority of residents living in the rural town also live in underground properties known as dugouts

A majority of residents living in the rural town also live in underground properties known as dugouts

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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