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Baby brain a real problem affecting pregnant women

  • ‘Baby brain’ has been proven as a genuine problem affecting pregnant women
  • Research by Victoria’s Deakin University found four in five are affected
  • Symptoms include forgetfulness, reading difficulties and poor concentration
  • Findings followed the analysis of 709 pregnant and 521 non-pregnant women

Research has proven ‘baby brain’ as a genuine phenomenon which affects the functionality of four in five pregnant women. 

The research conducted by Victoria’s Deakin University found the majority of expectant mothers suffer from forgetfulness, reading difficulties, confusion, disorientation and poor concentration.

‘Baby brain’ was found to be most prominent during the third trimester of pregnancy, where functionality and memory is ‘significantly reduced’, the Daily Telegraph reported. 

Research conducted by Victoria’s Deakin University has found ‘baby brain’ is a genuine phenomenon which affects the functionality of four in five pregnant women (stock image)

Deakin University associate professor Linda Byrne said the findings – which were published in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday – give pregnant women a genuine excuse for mental fog.      

‘It was certainly thought of as being a myth, which diminishes a woman’s experience of what she’s going through, but it is a real thing and it is measurable,’ Prof Byrne told the publication.

‘Anecdotally, it is something that we have known for a long time … a large number of women talk about feeling a bit foggy and we are saying that it is real.’ 

The research found the majority of expectant mothers suffer from 'baby brain' symptoms, which include forgetfulness, reading difficulties, confusion, disorientation and poor concentration (stock image) 

The research found the majority of expectant mothers suffer from ‘baby brain’ symptoms, which include forgetfulness, reading difficulties, confusion, disorientation and poor concentration (stock image) 

The findings followed the analysis of 20 separate studies on a total of 709 pregnant and 521 non-pregnant women. 

But although the phenomenon is real and quantifiable, Prof Byrne said its effect is minimal and still allows pregnant women to perform within the normal range of cognitive function.  

She added: ‘It’s not something that is at a level that we need to worry about, it is not going to affect how a woman does her job and day-to-day life.’

The cognitive changes are suspected to be related to the brain ‘reorganising itself’ and prioritising other tasks during pregnancy, Prof Byrne said.    



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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