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Cameron says he regrets ‘difficulties and problems’ caused by losing Brexit referendum

David Cameron says he regrets the ‘difficulties and problems’ caused by losing the Brexit referendum – but STILL insists he was right to call it

  • Theresa May is scrambling to find a way forward on Brexit after Commons defeat
  • David Cameron says he ‘regrets’ the ‘difficulties and problems’ that she is facing
  • But the former PM insisted he was still right to call the national vote in 2016 

David Cameron today admitted he regrets the ‘difficulties and problems’ caused by losing the Brexit referendum – but insisted he was right to call it. 

The ex-PM spoke out as Theresa May faces a fight for survival after the deal she thrashed out with the EU was brutally rejected by MPs.

Mrs May has been left scrambling to find a way through the deepening deadlock in Parliament and with the EU.

At the same she must fend off a no-confidence vote from Jeremy Corbyn today as he tries to force a general election.

Mr Cameron was accosted by reporters while out running near his London home this morning. 

David Cameron spoke out as Theresa May faces a fight for survival after the deal she thrashed out with the EU was brutally rejected by MPs

Asked if he was sorry for calling the referendum in 2016, he said: ‘I don’t regret calling the referendum… it was a promise I made.’

He added: ‘Obviously I regret that we lost the referendum. I deeply regret that… and obviously I regret the difficulties and the problems that we have been having trying to implement the result of that referendum.’ 

An extraordinary 118 Tory rebels, more than a third of the parliamentary party, joined forces with Labour to sink Mrs May’s withdrawal agreement by 432 votes to 202 – a majority of 230 – last night. 

Moments after the result was announced Mr Corbyn announced he would table a no-confidence motion, which MPs will vote on tonight, in a bid to force a general election. 

But the PM’s Northern Irish allies, former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, and backbench ringleader Jacob Rees-Mogg have all pledged to support her, meaning she is likely to survive. 

The DUP’s Sammy Wilson said the party wanted to ‘get the government back on track’ and would back Mrs May, while Mr Rees-Mogg said last night: ‘I will be supporting the Prime Minister’. 

Mr Johnson said he ‘certainly shall’ vote for the PM in Wednesday night’s vote, saying he did not want Mr Corbyn in office instead.  

Mrs May has been left scrambling to find a way through the deepening deadlock in Parliament and with the EU

Mrs May has been left scrambling to find a way through the deepening deadlock in Parliament and with the EU

 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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