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Channel 4’s Village Of The Year starts on Monday

Let’s be frank, we’re not short of pretty villages in the UK. 

There are thousands blessed with the beauty, history and charm that sum up all that’s Great about Britain. 

Now judges have the hard task of picking the nation’s best as part of a television show. 

Presented by Penelope Keith, Channel 4’s Village Of The Year will scour the country looking for flourishing communities over the next four weeks. 

The winner, announced next month, gets £10,000 towards a community initiative. 

Here, we present an exclusive preview of six of the contenders.

Tarskavaig, Isle of Skye 

Population: 60 

Pros: With an average house price of £230,000, Skye was recently named the best place to live in Britain. Tarskavaig, a tiny crofting village, is a hive of activity, where visitors can indulge in stargazing sessions and ceilidh dances. 

Drawbacks: Getting there isn’t easy, and with no superstore on the island, a local once travelled 126 miles to his nearest Lidl… but left his wallet behind. 

With an average house price of £230,000, the Isle of Skye was recently named the best place to live in Britain

Pembridge, Herefordshire 

Population: 1,056 

Pros: A cluster of higgledy-piggledy medieval buildings – including a 12th century church mentioned in the Domesday Book – Pembridge is home to herds of pedigree Hereford cattle. 

Drawbacks: This slightly sloping village on the valley of the River Arrow means most of the streets have raised pavements – not ideal for keen walkers.

Pembridge in Herefordshire is home to herds of pedigree Hereford cattle and higgledy-piggledy medieval buildings

Pembridge in Herefordshire is home to herds of pedigree Hereford cattle and higgledy-piggledy medieval buildings

Ilmington, Cotswolds 

Population: 712 

Pros: Boasting honey-coloured limestone cottages, Ilmington’s pretty church has 11 mice carved into its wooden fittings. Morris men have been performing for more than 400 years and their Grumpy Frog Cider – made using apples from ancient orchards – is the potent stuff of village legend. 

Drawbacks: Traffic can be heavy in summer and it’s not uncommon to stop as ducks waddle across the road.

Boasting honey-coloured limestone cottages, Ilmington’s pretty church in the Cotswolds has 11 mice carved into its wooden fittings

Boasting honey-coloured limestone cottages, Ilmington’s pretty church in the Cotswolds has 11 mice carved into its wooden fittings

Beer, Devon 

Population: 1,317 

Pros: Nestling on England’s 95-mile long Jurassic Coast, Beer was established by Flemish refugees in 1500 who brought the craft of lace making. Despite its charming name, Beer’s origin doesn’t come from ale, but from the Old English word bearu – meaning grove. 

Drawbacks: Perhaps a little too manicured, heaving with tourists in summer. Hills will test your thighs.

Nestling on England’s 95-mile long Jurassic Coast, Beer was established by Flemish refugees in 1500

Nestling on England’s 95-mile long Jurassic Coast, Beer was established by Flemish refugees in 1500

Clovelly, Devon 

Population: 443 

Pros: The tiny ancient port, with its steep cobbled street, is a huge draw for daytrippers. The undisputed stars of the village are its donkeys, which for centuries were used to haul fish up the hillsides. 

Drawbacks: You can’t drive into the village, and there’s a £7.25 entrance fee for visitors on foot.

The undisputed stars of Clovelly in Devon are its donkeys, which for centuries were used to haul fish up the hillsides

The undisputed stars of Clovelly in Devon are its donkeys, which for centuries were used to haul fish up the hillsides

Strangford, County Down 

Population: 475 

Pros: The largest enclosed inlet in the British Isles, much of Game of Thrones was filmed here. The pretty harbour overlooked by rows of 19th century cottages, is steeped in history. 

Drawbacks: Not normally known as a food and drink mecca, your main problem may now be deciding where to enjoy the best Guinness!

Much of Game of Thrones was filmed in Strangford, County Down, which is the largest enclosed inlet in the British Isles

Much of Game of Thrones was filmed in Strangford, County Down, which is the largest enclosed inlet in the British Isles

Channel 4’s Village of the Year starts on Monday at 3pm.



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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