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Dylan Dreyer’s 20-month-old son watches her report on Hurricane Florence

Today show meteorologist Dylan Dreyer’s toddler son was a bit confused as he watches his mom’s broadcast this morning

Dylan is on the scene in Wilmington, North Carolina, where she is braving heavy rains to report on Hurricane Florence.

But as her 20-month-old son Calvin watched from home, he couldn’t tell if it was rain or tears running down his mom’s face, and asked his dad if is mother was crying

Weather report: Today show meteorologist Dylan Dreyer has been reporting on the scene on Hurricane Florence

Weather report: Today show meteorologist Dylan Dreyer has been reporting on the scene on Hurricane Florence

There's mom! Her 20-month-old son was watching her from home

There's mom! Her 20-month-old son was watching her from home

There’s mom! Her 20-month-old son was watching her from home

She's sad? He asked his dad if mommy was crying as the rain poured on her

She’s sad? He asked his dad if mommy was crying as the rain poured on her

All good! Calvin's dad, Brian Fichera, reassured him that his mom was OK

All good! Calvin’s dad, Brian Fichera, reassured him that his mom was OK

Calvin’s dad, Brian Fichera, was at home with him on Friday morning and captured the little boy on video.

Calvin is sitting in a blush baby chair with his name on it, watching his mom report on the storm, when he turned to Brian.

‘Mommy crying?’ he asked, holding a cartoon sippy cup in his hands.

‘No, mommy’s not crying,’ his dad answered. When Calvin continued to look up at him, he went on, ‘Mommy’s OK, right? Mommy’s OK.’

The little boy giggled and happily went back to his sippy cup. 

As he posted the video on Instagram, Brian lauded his wife for her hard work, writing, ‘Mommy’s not crying bud mommy’s a pro. Thoughts and prayers with everyone in the path of #hurricaneflorence #mommysok #godylgo.’

Happy family! Dylan is pictured with her husband Brian and son Calvin

Happy family! Dylan is pictured with her husband Brian and son Calvin

Reporter: Dylan flew down to North Carolina earlier this week to cover the storm

Reporter: Dylan flew down to North Carolina earlier this week to cover the storm

Staying safe: She shared a photo of a boarded-up storefront

Staying safe: She shared a photo of a boarded-up storefront

Dylan left for Wilmington on Monday, taking a Gulfstream IV from Florida to cover the weather.

‘As a meteorologist, this is the opportunity of a lifetime!’ she wrote on Instagram.

On Tuesday, share began sharing photos from the ground, including one of a boarded-up storefront. On the wood, the owners listed locations of shelters and wrote: ‘Pray for Wilmington! May you, your family, and your home be safe.’

‘Our job as meteorologists is to get the word out during severe weather,’ Dylan wrote. ‘It’s a good sight to see the folks in Wilmington NC are boarding up and taking this hurricane seriously… even providing information for others in the area. ‘

Raging: Florence made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, at 7.15am this morning

Raging: Florence made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, at 7.15am this morning

Damage: Three inches of rain have been falling every hour, and 18 trillion gallons of rain are expected to fall across the Carolinas, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Maryland

Damage: Three inches of rain have been falling every hour, and 18 trillion gallons of rain are expected to fall across the Carolinas, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Maryland

Florence made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, at 7.15am this morning. At least 26,000 people sought refuge in shelters in the state, and 625,000 homes and businesses were reported to be without power.

The storm will continue to edge its way across the Carolinas for days, according to officials, who warned there was far more destruction and human suffering to come. 

‘It’s getting worse,’ North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said late on Friday morning, branding the rains a ‘thousand-year event’.

Three inches of rain have been falling every hour. Over seven days, 18 trillion gallons of rain are expected to fall across the Carolinas and Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Maryland. 

The wind speed has dropped slightly from 90mph when it made landfall to 75mph as of 2pm ET.

‘I see a biblical proportion flood event that’s going to occur,’ Wilmington Police Chief Ralph Evangelous told ABC News. I see the beach communities being inundated with water and destruction that will be pretty, pretty epic in nature.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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