News, Culture & Society

Egyptologists to open giant granite sarcophagus found where Alexander The Great may be buried

What will they find inside?Egyptologists prepare to open giant mystery sarcophagus found where Alexander The Great may be buried

  • Scientists say granite in the tomb is evidence that it belonged to a wealthy man 
  • It was found in modern Alexandria, which is top of city Alexander the Great built 
  • Expert says the tomb containing sarcophagus is too small to belong to the king  

Archaeologists in Egypt will open a 10ft-long sarcophagus dug up in the city where Alexander the Great may have been buried.

The 6.5ft-high coffin was unearthed in Alexandria, which is built on the city founded by the legendary leader.

Also found in the tomb that contained it was a bust made from alabaster whose features had eroded into obscurity. 

The sarcophagus (pictured) was unearthed in modern Alexandria, which is built on the city established by Alexander the Great 

Archaeologists say it is unlikely to belong to Alexander the Great as the tomb was not grand enough and this bust leaves little in the way of clues due to erosion 

Archaeologists say it is unlikely to belong to Alexander the Great as the tomb was not grand enough and this bust leaves little in the way of clues due to erosion 

Egyptologists determined the tomb belonged to a nobleman as opposed to a king, The Daily Telegraph reports. 

Some historians believe Alexander’s remains could one day be discovered on top of the modern city, which is built on the ancient settlement he established. 

Antiques ministry officials say the sarcophagus has been sealed for more than 2,000 years. An undisturbed layer of mortar sits between its lid and the body of the coffin.  

Questions as to the identity of the person inside persist due to the worn bust and the absence of any written inscriptions on the sarcophagus.  

Scientists say it belonged to a rich or noble man who lived between 323BC and 30BC. This was the time Rome seized Egypt and after the death of Cleopatra.

The tomb is thought to have belonged to a nobleman but not a king due to larger tombs discovered in the past being attributed to wealthy men as opposed to leaders 

The tomb is thought to have belonged to a nobleman but not a king due to larger tombs discovered in the past being attributed to wealthy men as opposed to leaders 

Leading Egyptologist and former antiquities minister Zahi Hawass said it ‘should belong to someone important, it is a granite sarcophagus’.

‘For someone to bring granite from Aswan [600 miles south] means he would have had to have been rich.’

But the tomb is said to be ‘too small’ for a king like Alexander as bigger ones have been found to contain Roman nobles.  

When news it would be opened surfaced online, American author Catherynne Valente joked: ‘If the movies have taught me anything, guys, don’t open that. Just don’t. Leave it alone.’  

Advertisement



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.