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Fat fighters! 648lbs woman sheds 254lbs as her 607lbs nephew loses 270lbs

A 648lb (294kg) woman and her 607lb (275kg) nephew have shed a whopping 500lbs (226kg) between them to save their lives.

Robin McKinley, 40, was able to go on a romantic date for the first time in years with her husband James after her year-long battle against the bulge.

Her nephew, Garrett, whose surname is unknown, has started training as a welder since losing weight, after stepping on the scales at 20-years-old gave him a shock.

The pair initially had to stick to a restrictive diet of just 600 calories a day to be granted surgery, by Dr Younan Nowzaradan, to help them lose more weight. 

Mrs McKinley and Garrett, from Kansas, made a joint effort to drop the pounds, in fear of becoming seriously ill. 

Robin McKinley, 40, and her nephew Garrett, 20, lost 500lbs (226kg) between them 

Depending on the patient's progress, Dr Nowzaradan (left) normally offers a gastric bypass surgery or sleeve gastrectomy

Depending on the patient’s progress, Dr Nowzaradan (left) normally offers a gastric bypass surgery or sleeve gastrectomy

Mrs McKinley detailed how a difficult life had led her to weight gain. She had been abused by the father as a child and also lost a baby after a previous boyfriend beat her

Mrs McKinley detailed how a difficult life had led her to weight gain. She had been abused by the father as a child and also lost a baby after a previous boyfriend beat her

After losing 254lbs (115kg), Mrs McKinley went on a date with her husband James (centre) for the first time in years. Garrett, right, lost 270lbs (112.5kg)

After losing 254lbs (115kg), Mrs McKinley went on a date with her husband James (centre) for the first time in years. Garrett, right, lost 270lbs (112.5kg)

In the TLC show My 600lb Life, Mrs McKinley told how her she had been abused by her father as a child and also lost a baby after a previous boyfriend beat her when he found out she was pregnant. 

Her sister also died from an illness in 2017. 

Mrs McKinley was forced to quit her job as a teacher after she became wheelchair-bound because her extreme weight had worn down the cartilage in her knees, giving her constant pain.

But she was determined to turn her troubled life around, despite her past ‘hurting so bad’. 

Mrs McKinley was the feature of the episode, but her brother Chris was also involved.

He had originally planned to travel to Houston, Texas – where Dr Nowzaradan treats patients – but suffered a heart attack before going.

The incident was a wake-up call for Garrett, the son of Chris, who weighed 607lb (275kg) at the age of 20.

Dr Nowzardan considered the young man to be ‘on track to be the world’s heaviest person if something doesn’t change’. 

Mrs Mckinley and Garrett then went on the hard-core weight loss journey together, under the care of the ruthless Dr Nowzardan – known on the show as ‘Dr Now’.

In one month, Mrs McKinley lost 33lbs (15kg) while Garrett shed 22lbs (10kg). 

The family, from Kansas, were morbidly obese, the TLC My 600lbs Life show revealed 

The family, from Kansas, were morbidly obese, the TLC My 600lbs Life show revealed 

The family moved to Houston, Texas, where the show's surgeon Dr Younan Nowzaradan monitors their weight loss in order to grant them surgery to further aid them

The family moved to Houston, Texas, where the show’s surgeon Dr Younan Nowzaradan monitors their weight loss in order to grant them surgery to further aid them

Garrett was approved for surgery first after getting down to 531lbs (241kg), while Mrs McKinley had her surgery a short time later. Pictured, before her surgery

Garrett was approved for surgery first after getting down to 531lbs (241kg), while Mrs McKinley had her surgery a short time later. Pictured, before her surgery

However, this was not enough for Dr Nowzaradan, and he refused to approve them for weight loss surgery until they lost more. 

So Mrs McKinley, her husband James and Garrett moved to Houston because that is where the surgeon was based. 

At first, Mrs McKinley struggled due to being hospitalised with an infection and only lost 9lbs (4kg). 

But after going on a 600-calorie a day diet, she managed to lose a whopping 87lbs (39kg). 

Garrett was approved for surgery first after getting down to 531lbs (241kg), while Mrs McKinley had her surgery a short time later. 

Depending on the patient’s progress, Dr Nowzaradan normally offers a gastric bypass surgery or sleeve gastrectomy.

At the end of 12 months, Mrs McKinley had shed a total of 254lbs (115kg) and went on a date for the first time in years with her husband, while Garrett had lost a total of 270lbs (122kg) and has started to train as a welder.    

WHAT IS OBESITY? AND WHAT ARE ITS HEALTH RISKS?

Obesity is defined as an adult having a BMI of 30 or over.

A healthy person’s BMI – calculated by dividing weight in kg by height in metres, and the answer by the height again – is between 18.5 and 24.9. 

Among children, obesity is defined as being in the 95th percentile.

Percentiles compare youngsters to others their same age. 

For example, if a three-month-old is in the 40th percentile for weight, that means that 40 per cent of three-month-olds weigh the same or less than that baby.

Around 58 per cent of women and 68 per cent of men in the UK are overweight or obese. 

The condition costs the NHS around £6.1billion, out of its approximate £124.7 billion budget, every year.

This is due to obesity increasing a person’s risk of a number of life-threatening conditions.

Such conditions include type 2 diabetes, which can cause kidney disease, blindness and even limb amputations.

Research suggests that at least one in six hospital beds in the UK are taken up by a diabetes patient.

Obesity also raises the risk of heart disease, which kills 315,000 people every year in the UK – making it the number one cause of death.

Carrying dangerous amounts of weight has also been linked to 12 different cancers. 

This includes breast, which affects one in eight women at some point in their lives.

Among children, research suggests that 70 per cent of obese youngsters have high blood pressure or raised cholesterol, which puts them at risk of heart disease.

Obese children are also significantly more likely to become obese adults. 

And if children are overweight, their obesity in adulthood is often more severe.  

As many as one in five children start school in the UK being overweight or obese, which rises to one in three by the time they turn 10.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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