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Horrified flood victim spots scaly intruder on her front lawn – as image of croc goes viral

A horrified flood victim who had a close encounter with a crocodile that was taking a a break on her mother’s front lawn has shared the shocking video online. 

The footage, which was captured on Sunday, shows the intruder on the woman’s mother’s lawn close to floodwaters in Townsville, North Queensland, Newsflare reported.  

‘The city is known for interesting wildlife including this “uninvited guest”, a seven-foot freshwater crocodile, who escaped the flooding and had a rest on my mother’s front lawn only a few feet from her back door,’ the resident said.  

Another resident shared a similar video of a massive croc resting on the front lawn of a house close to floodwaters in Townsville, North Queensland

Severe rainfall and flash flooding has continued to hit north Queensland over the last week, which has brought out plenty of intruders – specifically crocodiles and snakes.

Many distressed locals have shared footage of the predatory visitors in areas where they aren’t usually found. The images have since gone viral around the world.

One tweet from ABC News in the US, which shows a massive croc escaping floodwaters by climbing a fallen tree, went viral on Wednesday.  

‘A crocodile is seen climbing a tree in Townsville, Queensland to escape raging floodwaters,’ the accompanying caption stated. 

The post garnered plenty of reactions on social media, with many international followers sharing their thoughts online.

‘Poor Croc. You know that it’s bad when the Crocodiles are trying to get to dry land. Be safe my Australian friends,’ one person wrote.

‘Crocodiles in trees now…. That’s about right,’ another person said.

A third person added: ‘Time to evacuate Australia.’ 

The ABC tweet also stated: ‘Crocodile warnings have been issued in the Australian city amid “unprecedented” levels of flooding.’  

One tweet from ABC News in the US, which shows a massive croc (pictured) escaping floodwaters by climbing a fallen tree, went viral on Wednesday

One tweet from ABC News in the US, which shows a massive croc (pictured) escaping floodwaters by climbing a fallen tree, went viral on Wednesday

Justin Mills was on driving along the Bruce Highway through Ingham, three hours south of Cairns, when the 3.5metre croc (pictured) caused him to slam on his breaks

Justin Mills was on driving along the Bruce Highway through Ingham, three hours south of Cairns, when the 3.5metre croc (pictured) caused him to slam on his breaks

Queensland authorities on Monday issued a warning, advising locals to stay out of the water and be wary of what could potentially lie beneath the surface.  

Minister for Environment Leeanne Enoch said crocodiles and snakes could turn up in unexpected places during flooding. 

‘Crocodiles prefer calmer waters and they may move around in search of a quiet place to wait for floodwaters to recede,’ Ms Enoch said.

‘Crocodiles may be seen crossing roads, and when flooding recedes, crocodiles can turn up in unusual places such as farm dams or waterholes where they have not been seen before.’

One Queensland motorist who had a close encounter with a displaced croc on a highway shared a photo of the creature.

One crocodile was this week spotted in the residential neighbourhood of Mundingburra shortly before 10pm

One crocodile was this week spotted in the residential neighbourhood of Mundingburra shortly before 10pm

Australia's biggest northern city remains under siege as once in a century monsoons continue to flood homes

Australia’s biggest northern city remains under siege as once in a century monsoons continue to flood homes

Justin Mills was on Januray 30 driving through Ingham, three hours south of Cairns, on the Bruce Highway when the 3.5metre croc caused him to slam on his breaks.

Another local who discovered an unwelcome visitor on her family’s driveway was Townsville local Erin Hahn, who posted a photo of the croc just metres from her front door. 

‘Croc out the front of my dads place in Mundingburra, O’Reilly Sreet, Ross River Road end. Cannot stress it enough to stay out of the water,’ Ms Hahn wrote.       

The heavy rainfall has continued to ravage most of Queensland’s northeast over thelast few days, prompting authorities to warn of further flash flooding. 

With water levels at waist and chest height in some suburban streets, local police chief and District Disaster Coordinator Steve Munro said the crisis was only half over 

With water levels at waist and chest height in some suburban streets, local police chief and District Disaster Coordinator Steve Munro said the crisis was only half over 

Authorities went door-to-door to warn locals of the risks of staying as the 'unprecedented' once-in-a-century storm devastated some suburbs of the north Queensland area

Authorities went door-to-door to warn locals of the risks of staying as the ‘unprecedented’ once-in-a-century storm devastated some suburbs of the north Queensland area

An Emergency Alert flood message was also issued for Bluewater, Bluewater Park, Toolakea and Saunders Beach – urging locals to move to higher ground. 

Prime Minister Scott Morrison visited the region where the ‘once-in-a-century’ floods had inundated thousands of homes and closed airports and schools.

‘It’s just going to be tough, going to be tough for a while,’ Mr Morrison said. 

Queensland’s Bureau of Meteorology spokesman Richard Wardle said their seems little prospect of an immediate respite from the ‘Big Wet’.

‘We expect this active monsoon to remain active for the coming days, potentially easing over the weekend, so there is an end in sight.

‘But we are expecting further periods of heavy rainfall, some of it very heavy, about the northeast tropics for the next few days… with that there is the real elevated risk of flash flooding,’ Mr Wardle said.

There are fears up to 20,000 homes could be inundated with water in Townsville, north Queensland

There are fears up to 20,000 homes could be inundated with water in Townsville, north Queensland

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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