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How to create a $1,000 outfit for under $100

While many believe they have to fork out thousands for a designer look, eco stylist Faye De Lanty is on a mission to prove why this is most certainly not the case. 

The Sydney-based fashion guru, who is known for her love of sustainable style, recently spoke to FEMAIL about some of her top tips after teaming up with the Salvation Army for National Op Shop Week.

Faye said that while her love for fashion was always there, her interest in second-hand and thrifty style became a necessity when she was living overseas and on a very tight budget. 

‘I would scour the pages of Vogue then challenge myself to recreate all the amazing editorial and designer looks I saw for less,’ the London-born stylist said.

While many believe they have to fork out thousands for a designer look, eco stylist Faye De Lanty (pictured) is on a mission to prove why this is most certainly not the case

The Sydney-based fashion guru, who is known for her love of sustainable style, recently spoke to FEMAIL about some of her top tips after teaming up with the Salvation Army for National Op Shop Week

The Sydney-based fashion guru, who is known for her love of sustainable style, recently spoke to FEMAIL about some of her top tips after teaming up with the Salvation Army for National Op Shop Week

‘People began to ask me where my looks where from so, with the encouragement of my best friend I started my website fashionhound.tv.

Faye says while many women believe they need to spend big to look fabulous, this couldn’t be further from the truth. 

‘It’s so not about a big budget or brands… it’s about being a savvy and smart shopper,’ she said. 

‘I regularly create designer reinventions and high fashion looks I see for under $100, sometimes even $50.’ 

Faye created this chic Dior inspired get-up for just $57 and turned a men's tweed blazer into a bustier by positioning it differently and turned how you would normally wear it on its head

Faye created this chic Dior inspired get-up for just $57 and turned a men’s tweed blazer into a bustier by positioning it differently and turned how you would normally wear it on its head

'The buttons are done up at chest level, but the arms are kept out of the sleeves. These sleeves are then wrapped around the waist to create a belt/cinched in effect and they are secured at the back with a vintage brooch,' she said

‘The buttons are done up at chest level, but the arms are kept out of the sleeves. These sleeves are then wrapped around the waist to create a belt/cinched in effect and they are secured at the back with a vintage brooch,’ she said

What are Faye’s top five wardrobe staples? 

The trench coat

A great pair of jeans (I love vintage Levis)

A white tee, striped and or vintage rock tee

Pencil skirt

Black tux jacket/blazer 

When it comes to being thrifty, Faye says it’s important for women to do their homework and keep it simple. 

‘Look at fashion mags – British Vogue is my bible and has taught me so much about the language of fashion,’ she said. 

‘Explore online style websites, read about fashion history, go into designer stores, be curious, the more you know the more you can recreate what you see with second hand. 

‘Op Shops can be overwhelming, there’s so much to see. My suggestion is to start simply and only look for what you really need and would honestly wear. Don’t just buy a bunch of stuff because it’s cheap, be discerning and pick quality over quantity.’

Another look was this chic $50 outfit inspired by deconstructed suiting Faye spotted in Vogue and created it with a white men's shirt with large cuffs and her corset/bustier top was a super boho vibe top

Another look was this chic $50 outfit inspired by deconstructed suiting Faye spotted in Vogue and created it with a white men’s shirt with large cuffs and her corset/bustier top was a super boho vibe top

This was created entirely with Salvation Army clothing cost $65 and was inspired by a Milan street style blog. Faye said: 'This piece, which definitely has a Sass&Bide feel, is actually just four belts - two thick ones around Jamilla’s waist and two thinner ones over her shoulders'

This was created entirely with Salvation Army clothing cost $65 and was inspired by a Milan street style blog. Faye said: ‘This piece, which definitely has a Sass&Bide feel, is actually just four belts – two thick ones around Jamilla’s waist and two thinner ones over her shoulders’

This Dior inspired look cost $65 and was put together with clothing from Salvos stores

This Dior inspired look cost $65 and was put together with clothing from Salvos stores

Faye also swears by DIY style and says customising clothes you already have is a great way to buy into trends without breaking the bank. 

‘For example two big trends at the moment are fringing/tassels and head to toe florals,’ Faye said. 

Grab some fringing from a craft store, or I even look out for items that have it in our Salvos Op Shops… sometimes bedspreads or curtains do, even pillows.

‘The fringing or tassels that you find can then be easily added to the hem of a skirt, the sleeve cuffs of a shirt or even a bag.

‘With the head to toe florals, my tip is to add floral patches to classic jackets or accessories to give a nod to the trend without looking like a full on botanic garden!’

Both of these looks cost less than $50 each and the black blazer is a men's blazer from a Salvation Army store 

Both of these looks cost less than $50 each and the black blazer is a men’s blazer from a Salvation Army store 

'I regularly create designer reinventions and high fashion looks I see for under $100, sometimes even $50,' Faye (pictured in ethical Viktoria and Woods clothing) said 

‘I regularly create designer reinventions and high fashion looks I see for under $100, sometimes even $50,’ Faye (pictured in ethical Viktoria and Woods clothing) said 

Faye also recommends having a good dressmaker on speed dial as tailoring a good find is less expensive than buying it new. 

‘Especially if it’s designer like the DIOR Homme jacket I found. It cost me $30 from Salvos Stores. I had my dressmaker Jan alter the shoulders slightly for $15 so for just under $50 I scored a stunning designer piece,’ she said. 

She also recommends embracing the male section for white collared shirts, over-sized blazers and cool vintage t-shirts. 

When it comes to accessories, Faye said they are a great way to add eye-catching elements to an outfit. 

This Camel coat look with a Chanel inspired bag cost just $50 to put together 

This Camel coat look with a Chanel inspired bag cost just $50 to put together 

Faye is wearing a dress by Melbourne based Ethical brand Lois Hazel and her leather jacket is from Fabrique Vintage in Surry Hills and is actually three jackets ones upcycled into a 'new' one 

Faye is wearing a dress by Melbourne based Ethical brand Lois Hazel and her leather jacket is from Fabrique Vintage in Surry Hills and is actually three jackets ones upcycled into a ‘new’ one 

What are Faye’s top Op Shopping tips? 

* Educate yourself 

* Be prepared with an idea in mind 

* Follow fashion fundamentals like a timeless pair of jeans, a white tee and a little black dress 

* DIY and customise 

* Shop the store 

* Know your body 

* Become friends with op shops 

 * Have a good dressmaker on speed dial – altering is cheaper than buying new 

* Take a tool kit of snacks, water, a tape measure, inspiration pictures and a wish list  

‘I look for clutches with interesting details, quality or quirks,’ she said. 

‘Brooches are amazing… you can embellish a jacket by adding a cluster to a lapel, I also love them on bags or the bottom half of blazer labels.’ 

Faye recently put together a number of incredible designer outfits made with items she found in Salvos stores and Op Shops.

The first was a chic Dior inspired get-up that cost just $57. 

‘It’s my nod to the exquisite DIOR tailoring of the 50s with a modern twist. It’s the 70th anniversary of the couture house this year so I wanted to pay homage,’ she said. 

Faye turned a men’s tweed blazer into a bustier (no sewing required) by positioning it differently and turned how you would normally wear it on its head.

'It's so not about a big budget or brands... it's about being a savvy and smart shopper,' she said

‘It’s so not about a big budget or brands… it’s about being a savvy and smart shopper,’ she said

‘The buttons are done up at chest level, but the arms are kept out of the sleeves. These sleeves are then wrapped around the waist to create a belt/cinched in effect and they are secured at the back with a vintage brooch,’ she said. 

‘I teamed it with a brand new with tags Bardot mesh bodysuit I found for $10 and leather look pants I found for $12. I picked accessories that had a vintage feel, cats eye shades for $5 and diamante drop earrings for $10.

‘The blazer was $20 and because there was no sewing or changing the structure of the jacket this could easily be worn with jeans, a tee and heels – tweed is still a big trend at the moment.’

Another look was a gorgeous $50 outfit inspired by deconstructed suiting Faye spotted in Vogue.

'I regularly create designer reinventions and high fashion looks I see for under $100, sometimes even $50,' Faye said 

‘I regularly create designer reinventions and high fashion looks I see for under $100, sometimes even $50,’ Faye said 

‘I was so inspired by the deconstructed suiting in the August issue of Australian Vogue that I spent a good day brainstorming how I could recreate it on a budget. I also wanted to display how relevant, modern and on trend op shops can be,’ she said. 

‘Joyce is wearing a white men’s shirt with large cuffs and her corset/bustier top was actually a super boho vibe top with way too much sheer fabric going on so I just sliced it all off and underneath was this gorgeous structured piece which I layered over the shirt.

‘On the bottom half you can see grey fabric peeping out underneath – that is a $5 size 18 grey pinstripe skirt that was super outdated in style but the fabric was nice and I wanted it to be large so I could slice it and wrap it around Joyce to create an asymmetrical/waterfall effect.

‘The houndstooth fabric on top is actually a vest which I turned into a skirt, again no sewing I just wrapped the collar around her waist and secured it in place with vintage brooches, the layers and print clash create great texture and contrast.’ 

Faye has teamed up with Wardrobe Crisis author Clare Press for National Op Shop Week and is hosting a number of upcycling workshops

Faye has teamed up with Wardrobe Crisis author Clare Press for National Op Shop Week and is hosting a number of upcycling workshops

Another created entirely with Salvation Army clothing cost $65 and was inspired by a Milan street style blog. 

‘I absolutely loved the harness looking feature, so I thought about it for a while, studied what I saw and noticed that it kind of looked like belts, so that’s what I used,’ she said. 

‘This piece, which definitely has a Sass&Bide feel, is actually just four belts – two thick ones around Jamilla’s waist and two thinner ones over her shoulders to create this effect and done up at the back rather than the front.’

The thinner ones are just tucked under the thicker belts and I teamed it with Cue pants. a simple white tee, a Zara spotted Blazer and Tony Bianco heels.’

Faye has teamed up with Wardrobe Crisis author Clare Press for National Op Shop Week and is hosting a number of upcycling workshops. For more information visit http://salvosstores.salvos.org.au/about-us/news-and-events/national-op-shop-week-2017/ 

She shares her top tips on her Instagram page.  

Faye’s top tips for shopping sustainably  

1. Stop before you shop

Take a breath and ask yourself can I buy it second hand, do I already have it, can I reinvent it or revive it!?

2. Donate and keep the cycle moving

It was when I had too much clothing that I used to suffer from the dreaded ‘I have nothing to wear’.

Now that I have decluttered and regularly donate what I am no longer wearing I have a much smaller wardrobe but so many mix and match options. Don’t hoard, spring clean on the regular, it’s so therapeutic and you will feel so much more organised.

3. Ask questions… do you know ‘who made your clothes’ or where they came from? 

As consumers we have so much power to change the market and mass production. I regularly use apps like ‘Good On You’ which helps me make more informed shopping decisions if I am going to buy new. I also investigate the brands I am desiring something from and get a handle on their ethos, I try to only choose ethical or conscious brands when I am buying new clothes or accessories.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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