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Iceland is deemed the safest country in the world, with Europe dominating the top 20 places

Iceland is the world’s safest country while the Philippines is the most dangerous, according to a new study.

Global Finance Magazine considers war and peace, crime rates and the risk of natural disasters in working out its Safety Index Score for each nation.

Iceland came top due to its tiny crime rate, with under 400,000 residents – and although the island contains active volcanoes – there is a low risk to life.

The US was one of the exception’s to the rule for economically developed countries – placing 65th – in large part due to its homicide rate. 

The most safe countries on the left, with Iceland top and the most dangerous countries on the right, with the Philippines at the top

Reykjavik in Iceland - the country has a population of under 400,000 and is considered to be the safest in the world by the magazine

Reykjavik in Iceland – the country has a population of under 400,000 and is considered to be the safest in the world by the magazine

Iceland has prevalent gun ownership but has a tiny per capita murder rate which is dwarfed by the United States

Iceland has prevalent gun ownership but has a tiny per capita murder rate which is dwarfed by the United States

Global Finance magazine included 128 of the 193 states recognised by the UN on its list, with notable absences including Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan.

It is not clear why such states – which regularly rank among the most dangerous in the world – did not feature in their calculations. 

According to the FBI there were 5.3 murders per 100,000 people in 2017, this is more than double most of its European economic counterparts.

On the other hand, Iceland is said to be filled with guns but had just a single murder in 2009, according to the BBC.

Many believe the low per capita murder rate in Iceland is down to lack of a class system, which prevents jealousy and also low drug usage. 

As well as America’s high homicide rate the continental mass of North America puts US citizens at more risk of natural disaster than their European cousins across the Atlantic.

Japan was also an anomaly among the top economies for that reason, placing 43rd, due to their high risk of natural disaster with earthquakes in the region. 

America's high homicide rate is one of the main reasons for it falling well below its economic counterparts in the list of the safest countries

America’s high homicide rate is one of the main reasons for it falling well below its economic counterparts in the list of the safest countries

Residences leveled by California wildfires last year - another reason for the US falling below Europe is due to a higher prevalence of natural disasters on the colossal continent

Residences leveled by California wildfires last year – another reason for the US falling below Europe is due to a higher prevalence of natural disasters on the colossal continent

European countries scored particularly well, accounting for seven countries out of the top ten and 15 out of the top 20.

Global Finance attribute the scores to developed economies and healthcare systems which protect people from dangers such as undernourishment and disease.

The UK placed 38th, coming after Romania and Kuwait on the safety index. Australia was ranked 18th.

Yemen, which is a violent famine-ridden war zone, placed second-bottom on the list, with the Philippines found to be the most dangerous place to live.

Although Yemen is an active war zone, and people face a greater military and security risk, the magazine deemed the risk from natural disasters in the Philippines to be so grave it takes its score higher.

A member of Yemeni pro-government forces fires a heavy machine gun during a fragile ceasefire in the port city of Hodeidah, Yemen last week, the country is the second most dangerous in the world according to the study

A member of Yemeni pro-government forces fires a heavy machine gun during a fragile ceasefire in the port city of Hodeidah, Yemen last week, the country is the second most dangerous in the world according to the study

A house is flooded in the typhoon-hit province of Camarines Sur, Philippines earlier this month

A house is flooded in the typhoon-hit province of Camarines Sur, Philippines earlier this month

The Ukraine and Russia placed far down the list compared to other European countries.

This is due to a civil war raging in the Ukraine, in which Russia is playing a part.

Meanwhile the magazine said that Russians face disproportionate levels of violent crime and the dire economic situation puts them at a further security risk. 

They used data from the World Economic Forum and the Global Institute for Peace to create their list.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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