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Iconic images chronicle NASA outerspace missions and lunar exploration

Stunning images depicting icons of the space race like Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin undertaking moonwalks on lunar landscapes and and astronauts in flight are being displayed at an auction house in New York.

NASA crew members are photographed during various missions such as Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab, as well as other national space programs. 

Dramatic prints from the decades-long space program spans from the remarkable breakthrough period for science of 1960 through to 2002. 

The collection includes incredible images of space walks including Neil Armstrong’s first walk on the moon, astronaut Edward H. White II pictured against the spectacular backdrop of the brightly-lit Earth behind him.  

 

Astronaut Edward H. White II in 1965, from a NASA archive of 350 silver and chromogenic prints chronicling missions in space, 1960-2002. The prints are estimated to cost $6,000 to $9,000

Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr. stands with the United States flag in 1969. Stunning images depicting icons of the space race like Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin undertaking moonwalks on lunar landscapes and and astronauts in flight are being displayed at an auction house in New York

Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr. stands with the United States flag in 1969. Stunning images depicting icons of the space race like Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin undertaking moonwalks on lunar landscapes and and astronauts in flight are being displayed at an auction house in New York

Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr. in 1972. The archive is one of the highlights of Swann Galleries' February 21 Photographs: Art & Visual Culture auction in New York

Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr. in 1972. The archive is one of the highlights of Swann Galleries’ February 21 Photographs: Art & Visual Culture auction in New York

Astronaut Ed White floats over the Gulf of Mexico in 1965, pictured. NASA crew members are photographed during various missions such as Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab, as well as other national space programs

Astronaut Ed White floats over the Gulf of Mexico in 1965, pictured. NASA crew members are photographed during various missions such as Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab, as well as other national space programs

An astronaut’s boot in the lunar soil, astronauts in flight and pictured floating in space crafts during flight and images taken on Earth, at the Lyndon B. Johnson and Kennedy Space Centers are among other images. 

The archive is one of the highlights of Swann Galleries’ February 21 Photographs: Art & Visual Culture auction in New York. 

Photos of Earthrise, the celebrated view of the Earth as it rises over the Moon’s horizon, are also in the archive being shown in the vast gallery.

Most of the images measure approximately 8 x 10 inches, with some slightly larger and smaller. The estimate is $6,000 to $9,000 (£4,630- £6,945).

Nearly all the pictures come with a NASA credit and inventory number in the negative, and with a memeographed or typed caption, with detailed information, locations and dates. 

Other images show astronauts in training, during press conferences, and preparing for lift-off, with photographs of fiery launches, and returning touchdowns. 

A view of Earth rising above the lunar horizon in 1969. Other images show astronauts in training, during press conferences, and preparing for lift-off, with photographs of fiery launches, and returning touchdowns

A view of Earth rising above the lunar horizon in 1969. Other images show astronauts in training, during press conferences, and preparing for lift-off, with photographs of fiery launches, and returning touchdowns

Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr. with the Lunar Roving Vehicle in 1972. An astronaut's boot in the lunar soil, astronauts in flight and pictured floating in space crafts during flight and images taken on Earth, at the Lyndon B. Johnson and Kennedy Space Centers are among other images

Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr. with the Lunar Roving Vehicle in 1972. An astronaut’s boot in the lunar soil, astronauts in flight and pictured floating in space crafts during flight and images taken on Earth, at the Lyndon B. Johnson and Kennedy Space Centers are among other images

Astronaut Mae C. Jemison floating on the Endeavor space craft in 1992. Nearly all the pictures come with a NASA credit and inventory number in the negative, and with a memeographed or typed caption, with detailed information, locations and dates

Astronaut Mae C. Jemison floating on the Endeavor space craft in 1992. Nearly all the pictures come with a NASA credit and inventory number in the negative, and with a memeographed or typed caption, with detailed information, locations and dates

‘This important archive, which spans the remarkable period of 1960 through 2002, depicts the extraordinary dedication of exceptional Americans in their quest for knowledge of the last frontier-Outer Space,’ said Swann Galleries’ specialist Daile Kaplan.

‘All of the photographs contain a NASA credit and inventory number, and the majority are captioned. The archive features both colour and black-and-white prints that are a direct record of the NASA programs’ achievements and contextualise a remarkable era of exploration.’

‘The 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong’s first Moonwalk is on July 20, this is a unique opportunity to acquire stunning prints of the decades-long space program,’ said Ms Kaplan.

The original seven astronauts in Mercury space suits in 1962. Back row: Alan Shepard, Gus Grissom, Gordon Cooper; front row: Wally Schirra, Deke Slayton, John Glenn, Scott Carpenter

The original seven astronauts in Mercury space suits in 1962. Back row: Alan Shepard, Gus Grissom, Gordon Cooper; front row: Wally Schirra, Deke Slayton, John Glenn, Scott Carpenter

Aldrin Jr. descends the steps of the Lunar Module in 1969. Dramatic prints from the decades-long space program spans from the remarkable breakthrough period for science of 1960 through to 2002

Aldrin Jr. descends the steps of the Lunar Module in 1969. Dramatic prints from the decades-long space program spans from the remarkable breakthrough period for science of 1960 through to 2002

A close-up of an astronaut's boot in the lunar soil in 1969. The archive features both color and black-and-white prints that are a direct record of the NASA programs' achievements and contextualise a remarkable era of exploration

A close-up of an astronaut’s boot in the lunar soil in 1969. The archive features both color and black-and-white prints that are a direct record of the NASA programs’ achievements and contextualise a remarkable era of exploration

WHAT WAS THE APOLLO PROGRAM?

NASA photo taken on July 16, 1969 shows the huge, 363-foot tall Apollo 11 Spacecraft 107/Lunar Module S/Saturn 506) space vehicle launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 9:32 a.m. (EDT).

NASA photo taken on July 16, 1969 shows the huge, 363-foot tall Apollo 11 Spacecraft 107/Lunar Module S/Saturn 506) space vehicle launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 9:32 a.m. (EDT).

Apollo was the NASA programme that launched in 1961 and got man on the moon.

The first four flights tested the equipment for the Apollo Program and six of the other seven flights managed to land on the moon.

The first manned mission to the moon was Apollo 8 which circled around it on Christmas Eve in 1968 but did not land.

The crew of Apollo 9 spent ten days orbiting Earth and completed the first manned flight of the lunar module – the section of the Apollo rocket that would later land Neil Armstrong on the Moon.  

The Apollo 11 mission was the first on to land on the moon on 20 July 1969.

The capsule landed on the Sea of Tranquillity, carrying mission commander Neil Armstrong and pilots Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins.

Armstrong and Aldrin walked on the lunar surface while Collins remained in orbit around the moon. 

When Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon, he said, ‘That’s one small step for (a) man; one giant leap for mankind.’

Apollo 12 landed later that year on 19 November on the Ocean of Storms, writes NASA.  

Apollo 13 was to be the third mission to land on the moon, but just under 56 hours into flight, an oxygen tank explosion forced the crew to cancel the lunar landing and move into the Aquarius lunar module to return back to Earth.  

Apollo 15 was the ninth manned lunar mission in the Apollo space program, and considered at the time the most successful manned space flight up to that moment because of its long duration and greater emphasis on scientific exploration than had been possible on previous missions. 

The last Apollo moon landing happened in 1972 after a total of 12 astronauts had touched down on the lunar surface.

Astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin unpacking experiments from the Lunar Module on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission. Photographed by Neil Armstrong, 20 July 1969

Astronaut Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin unpacking experiments from the Lunar Module on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission. Photographed by Neil Armstrong, 20 July 1969

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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