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Island mourns the loss of its only duck – Trevor the mallard

Farewell to Trevor the mallard: Small Pacific island mourns the loss of its only duck (and he suffered a brutal death)

  • The Pacific island of Niue says goodbye to its only duck, Trevor the mallard
  • Trevor the duck was seen dead in a bush after being attacked by a dog
  • Trevor ended up in Niue after a storm last year and live in a puddle by the road
  • He was used as a local landmark for directions and won hearts of many locals
  • Niue’s jagged landscape does not provide an ecosystem for wetlands or ponds 

The Pacific island of Niue is mourning the loss of its only duck after he was attacked by a dog and found dead in a bush.  

The nation, which has a population of under 2000, was brought to the spotlight last year after the duck was found sitting in a large puddle by a muddy road. 

The island country, which comprises of a jagged landscape of corals, does not provide an ecosystem for many wetlands or ponds for ducks to reside in. 

The duck, affectionately named Trevor the mallard, quickly became a celebrity among locals who often fed it and stopped to take selfies.  

The Pacific island of Niue has said its farewell to their only duck, Trevor the mallard (pictured)

Niue comprises of a jagged landscape of corals and does not provide an ecosystem for many wetlands or ponds (stock image)

Niue comprises of a jagged landscape of corals and does not provide an ecosystem for many wetlands or ponds (stock image)

The lone duck had also been used as a landmark for directions.     

No one knows for sure how Trevor ended up in the island country, but a Facebook page dedicated to the mallard speculated he flew in from a storm last year.

Since Trevor’s arrival, the Niue Fire Service would top up his puddle from time to time in order to maintain a habitat for him. 

Niue’s former New Zealand high commissioner also once fed the mallard with bok choy.  

The duck was named after Trevor Mallard, the speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives. 

The Niue Fire Service made sure to top up the puddle from time to time in order to maintain a habitat for Trevor (pictured)

The Niue Fire Service made sure to top up the puddle from time to time in order to maintain a habitat for Trevor (pictured)

Trevor’s presence in Niue brought fame to the island made up of just over 1,600 people. 

‘After a year of driving around with a bag of oats always in my car, I’ll miss my stops on the way to and from work to feed and check on Trevor,’ Niue Chamber of Commerce chief executive Rae Findlay told ABC. 

‘He will definitely be missed, he captured many hearts and even the rooster, the chicken and the weka were looking a little forlorn today wandering around the near dry puddle’. 

Niue is a self-governing state but Niueans are also considered citizens of New Zealand. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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