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John Bercow ‘could be first Speaker in 230 years not to get a peerage’ over bias concerns

John Bercow ‘could be first Speaker in 230 years not to get a peerage over concerns he is biased’

  • John Bercow may not automatically get a peerage over concerns he is biased 
  • No10 usually approves a seat in the House of Lords for former Speakers
  • This may not happen after controversy over Mr Bercow’s recent decisions
  • He defied years of precedent last week to allow MPs to take control of House of Commons business

John Bercow may become the first Speaker in 230 years to not automatically receive a peerage after ministers accused him of bias, it was reported last night.

No10 usually approves holders of the role being granted a seat in the House of Lords, but after controversy over Mr Bercow’s recent decisions, it is understood this may not happen.

The Speaker defied years of precedent last week to allow MPs to take control of House of Commons business. 

Retiring Speakers usually retire as an MP at the same time they step down, triggering a by-election. Mr Bercow had vowed to step down last year after serving nine years. But he has continued in the role to the fury of his Tory critics [File photo]

One senior Tory told the Times: ‘Precedents of Speakers getting peerages don’t last forever either.’

Mr Bercow, a former Conservative MP, has been accused of favouring Labour MPs and colluding with them to stop Brexit under the guise of championing backbenchers.

A Cabinet source told the paper: ‘It’s a good job that peerage nominations are in our gift – I’m sure we’ll be thinking carefully about which individuals we would choose to elevate to the House of Lords.

‘I can’t imagine we would look favourably on those who’ve cheated centuries of procedure.’

Retiring Speakers usually retire as an MP at the same time they step down, triggering a by-election. 

Mr Bercow had vowed to step down last year after serving nine years. But he has continued in the role to the fury of his Tory critics.

He has also previously admitted to voting remain in the 2016 referendum and his wife’s car bears a ‘b******* to Brexit’ sticker. The Speaker is supposed to be neutral.

After a Speaker steps down, a motion is traditionally passed by the Commons asking the Queen to ‘confer some signal mark of her Royal favour upon’ he or she for ‘eminent services during the important period in which he presided with such distinguished ability and dignity’.

The Speaker, pictured centre, defied years of precedent last week to allow MPs to take control of House of Commons business. One senior Tory told the Times: ‘Precedents of Speakers getting peerages don’t last forever either' 

The Speaker, pictured centre, defied years of precedent last week to allow MPs to take control of House of Commons business. One senior Tory told the Times: ‘Precedents of Speakers getting peerages don’t last forever either’ 

But the ‘signal mark’ does not have to be a peerage, though this is usually waved through by No10.

Gordon Brown faced controversy in 2009 after approving a peerage for Michael Martin, the former speaker who stood down after an expenses scandal.

A move to block Mr Bercow’s peerage would prove controversial, but Government sources told the paper it was within the Prime Minister’s power. A No10 source said he was not aware of any plan to stop Mr Bercow receiving a peerage.

Mr Bercow’s elevation would also be contentious because he has faced allegations of bullying former members of staff, which he denies, and he has called House of Commons Leader Andrea Leadsom a ‘stupid woman’.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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