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Man hits 18-stone wild boar with car in Forest of Dean Gloucestershire causing £5000 damage 

Shocking THUD as driver slams into 18-stone wild boar that suddenly runs across road in Forest of Dean – leaving him with £5,000 repair bill

  • The wild boar crossed the street suddenly and hit the car’s bumper violently 
  • Despite huge £5,000 damage, the 18-stone boar walked off fine after the impact
  • The boar population in the Forest of Dean is currently the largest in England 

This is the moment a driver slams into a huge wild boar in the Forest of Dean, leaving his car’s bumper with big damage worth £5,000.

Footage shows the car driving on the road, when the wild boar quickly runs across the road and hits the car’s front bumper.

The incident happened in the Forest of Dean, in Gloucestershire, where the boar population is the largest in England and is continuing to grow.

The car stopped suddenly and the 18-stone wild boar walked off fine after the violent crash

Wild boars are strong large animals and they can move very fast despite their significant size

Wild boars are strong large animals and they can move very fast despite their significant size

Just before the animal runs on the street and the violent collision takes place, three cars can be seen driving in the opposite direction.

The 18-stone boar walked off fine after the violent impact, but the car’s bumper was destroyed.

The huge damage caused by the impact with the animal is worth about £5,000. 

Wild boars were once common in England before being hunted to extinction about 300 years ago.

Small populations of wild boars have become established again in the wild in recent years after being released from farms.

Wild boars are strong and large animals, that can move very fast despite their size.

The impact happened quickly when the wild animal bumped into the car

The front bumper of the car was destroyed by the impact

The accident happened in the Forest of Dean, in Gloucestershire, where there is a very big wild boar population

They have poor eyesight but a keen sense of smells, according to Forestry England.

The original population was established near Ross-on-Wye during the 1990s.

In 2004 a group of around 60 animals was released and it is believed that by 2009 the two populations had merged.

Male boars tend to be seen alone and can grow to a significant size.

The damage caused by the impact with the animal in the forest is worth about £5,000

The damage caused by the impact with the animal in the forest is worth about £5,000

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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