News, Culture & Society

Monsoon trough could develop into cyclone as Queensland farmers tally up the damage

Shocking pictures of cow corpses have emerged in Queensland after 10 days of devastating floods. 

The big wet has dumped nearly two-years worth of rain in little more than a week in parts of the sunshine state as a punishing monsoon trough made its way across Queensland.

Central western Queensland farmer Mr Ren Field recorded more than 835mm of rain over a ten day period, and looked to his livestock to assess the real damage of the storm, The Courier Mail reported.

Farmers across flood ravaged Queensland could be left millions of dollars out of pocket as devastating floods leave behind destroyed crops, livestock and livelihoods

The big wet has dumped nearly two-years worth of rain in little more than a week in parts of the sunshine state as a punishing monsoon trough made its way across Queensland

The big wet has dumped nearly two-years worth of rain in little more than a week in parts of the sunshine state as a punishing monsoon trough made its way across Queensland

‘We have lost 700 cattle out of 1000 (so far) from exhaustion, starvation, freezing winds and floodwater,’ he said. 

While hundreds of homes have been damaged, the farmers are turning to the wrecked crops and livestock to tally up the damage.

Floodwaters have killed up to 300,000 cattle in western Queensland, with losses put at a staggering $300 million.

Richmond Mayor John Wharton says there have been huge stock losses in his area, as well as McKinlay shire, and parts of Flinders and Cloncurry shires.

Meanwhile, the rural lobby group AgForce has warned thousands more could be dead by the weekend unless emergency fodder shipments reach them immediately.

Eddington cattle station owner Rae Stretton said that whatever cattle the flood did not wipe out, would have to be put down because of the grim conditions.

Jane McMillan said she had probably lost 40 to 50 per cent of her livestock, but considered herself more fortunate than others who had lost everything.

‘People have lost their income for the next three years,’ she said.

The distraught farmer said it was not just livestock that was impacted, but also the native wildlife, sheep, horses and kangaroos. 

‘They’re all dying, they’re dying from drowning in the floodwaters … or the cold wind’.

With cold winds reaching up to 50km/h, farmers are having a hard time dropping fodder to the remaining livestock. 

And just as farmers begin to assess the damage, weather forecasters have warned the monsoon trough could develop into a cyclone.

Bureau of Meteorology said the conditions were perfect for the weather system to gain strength as it hovers over the Coral Sea.    

‘We don’t want to alarm people yet because it is not certain, but we can’t completely rule it out,’ forecaster David Crock said.

Mr Crock explained the trough could meet with a broad low-pressure system hanging around near New Caledonia and Vanuatu. 

‘Once it is out over the sea, it is a very different system. The ocean is warm and it is the right time of year for cyclones to form, so there is a lot in its favour to form into a cyclone,’ Mr Crock said. 

Central western Queensland farmer Mr Ren Field recorded more than 835mm of rain over a ten day period, and looked to his livestock to assess the real damage of the storm

Central western Queensland farmer Mr Ren Field recorded more than 835mm of rain over a ten day period, and looked to his livestock to assess the real damage of the storm

While hundreds of homes have been damaged, the farmers are turning to the wrecked crops and livestock to tally up the damage

While hundreds of homes have been damaged, the farmers are turning to the wrecked crops and livestock to tally up the damage

‘That would be obviously the worst case scenario and there is no indication yet. Fingers crossed that does not happen ‘

Hundreds of people remain holed up in Townsville evacuation centres as authorities race to find emergency accommodation for families whose homes were destroyed by floods.

Elsewhere in the north Queensland city, several suburbs remain partially flooded as mopping up operations continue in the tropical heat.

Homeless families now face a long wait for their flood-damaged homes to be repaired after 10 days of catastrophic flooding.

More than 730 homes have been found to be severely damaged and 252 completely uninhabitable following about 1,500 damage assessments, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said on Thursday.

Eddington cattle station owner Rae Stretton said that whatever cattle the flood did not wipe out, would have to be put down because of the grim conditions

Eddington cattle station owner Rae Stretton said that whatever cattle the flood did not wipe out, would have to be put down because of the grim conditions

Jane McMillan said she had probably lost 40 to 50 per cent of her livestock, but considered herself more fortunate than other who had lost everything

Jane McMillan said she had probably lost 40 to 50 per cent of her livestock, but considered herself more fortunate than other who had lost everything

‘That is sad news for families,’ she told reporters.

About 20,000 homes are believed to have sustained water impact in the Townsville area.

It’s pushed the damage bill from the near-citywide floods to $124 million and rising, the Insurance Council says.

‘As of 10am (on Thursday), insurers (HAD) received 10,064 claims, with insurance losses estimated at $124 million,’ the council’s Campbell Fuller said.

He also warned that scammers were active in Townsville, with fake tradies going door to door offering building inspections and repairs for cash before taking the money and running.

There have been more than 16,000 claims for personal hardship assistance with more than $1.9 million paid out so far.

Even as Townsville continues cleaning up after the floods, more flood waters are washing across west and northwest Queensland. 

With cold winds reaching up to 50km/h, farmers are having a hard time dropping fodder to the remaining livestock

With cold winds reaching up to 50km/h, farmers are having a hard time dropping fodder to the remaining livestock

And just as farmers begin to assess the damage, weather forecasters have warned the monsoon trough could develop into a cyclone

And just as farmers begin to assess the damage, weather forecasters have warned the monsoon trough could develop into a cyclone

 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.