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Mother claims son was sent home for ‘extreme’ braids

A mother-of-two claims her son was sent home from school after turning up for class with his hair in braids.

Trisha Jukes, 34, says her son Jordan Waterfield was first sent to isolation before teachers ordered him to leave the school.

The 15-year-old had returned after half-term with the top of his hair braided, while the sides were left long.

However staff at the RSA Academy in Tipton, West Midlands, sent Jordan straight to isolation for his ‘extreme haircut’.

The 15-year-old had returned after half-term with the top of his hair braided, while the sides were left long (shown)

Trisha Jukes, 34, says her son Jordan Waterfield (pictured) was first sent to isolation before teachers ordered him to leave the school for his ‘extreme’ haircut

Ms Jukes (pictured) rang the school and after speaking to multiple members of staff she claims the school retracted their decision and told her to bring him back the same day

Ms Jukes (pictured) rang the school and after speaking to multiple members of staff she claims the school retracted their decision and told her to bring him back the same day

Ms Jukes claims she then received an upset phone call from her son who said she had to pick him up from school.

She said: ‘I never imagined there’d be a problem with Jordan’s hair, girls go to school with plaits in, so why couldn’t my son.

‘As soon as I found out that he was put in isolation I was shocked, his hair cut wasn’t bothering anyone.

‘It’s a shame that he has missed out on a big chunk of education for the day just because of his hair.

School’s uniform policy 

Guidelines on school uniform at the RSA Academy state that ‘hair should be neat, tidy and safe with no extremes of fashion’, adding that ‘tramlines’ are not allowed.

The school does not differentiate between uniforms for boys and girls, with both sexes allowed to wear tailored trousers or a knee-length skirt if they wish.

‘If other people in his school are allowed to have plaits in their hair, my son should be too. It isn’t an “extreme haircut” in the slightest.’

Ms Jukes rang the school and after speaking to multiple members of staff she claims the school retracted their decision and told her to bring him back the same day.

She said: ‘Jordan has been going to that school for four years and nothing like this has ever happened with regards to his hair.

‘His hair cut wasn’t doing anything to effect his learning – but sending him home from school is. 

‘The braids were only tied together by small black elastic bands – and the rest of his uniform was immaculate.

‘As soon as Jordan returned home last Wednesday at lunchtime, I spoke to the school and complained.

Staff at the RSA Academy in Tipton, West Midlands, sent Jordan straight to isolation for his 'extreme haircut'

Jordan Waterfield and mother Trisha Jukes

Staff at the RSA Academy in Tipton, West Midlands, sent Jordan straight to isolation for his ‘extreme haircut’

‘After being passed from one member of staff to the next, I was told Jordan was allowed back into school a few hours later.’

In a bid to tidy up his hair, Jordan had his hair cut shorter and opted for two small shaven lines into his hair.

But Ms Jukes claims this enraged the school even further and he was later put in isolation once again. 

She said she is in constant communication with the RSA Academy to try and come to an agreement.

The RSA Academy declined to comment.

Let little boys wear tiaras if they want, rules the Church of England

Boys as young as five should be able to wear tiaras at school under new guidelines (stock image)

Boys as young as five should be able to wear tiaras at school under new guidelines (stock image)

Boys as young as five should be able to wear tiaras at school without criticism, teachers in Church of England schools are to be told.

Male pupils should also be free to dress up in a tutu or high heels without attracting any comment or observation, according to anti-bullying rules sent out by the Church on Sunday.

The instructions for the CofE’s 4,700 schools said they should not require children to wear uniforms that ‘create difficulty for trans pupils’.

This appears to give official backing to schools that ban skirts to avoid discrimination against transgender children.

Schools are also told they cannot use the Christian faith or Bible teachings to justify behaviour that is considered to amount to bullying – for example, identifying a transgender pupil by a sex other than the one they have chosen. 

The advice contains instructions on how to report bullying, including sample forms on which teachers are encouraged to name the alleged bully and their target, and use tick boxes to describe what happened.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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