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Nine in ten MPs warn care system not fit for purpose

Nine in ten MPs believe the social care system is not fit for purpose, a poll suggests.

Research also found 86 per cent of MPs in England believe a cross-party consensus is needed to tackle health and social care.

The survey of 101 English MPs reveals only 10 per cent believe the current system is suitable for the UK’s ageing population.

The Department of Health said it is committed to improving social care after a survey of 101 English MPs found only 10 per cent believe the current system is suitable for the UK’s ageing population 

Politicians and campaigners said the system is creaking at the seams and confidence in it has virtually evaporated.

Only 13 per cent of Labour MPs and 35 per cent of Conservatives believe that social care services in their constituencies are fit for purpose.

The poll by ComRes also found only one in five Tory MPs (21 per cent) and less than one in ten Labour MPs in England believe there is sufficient funding for social care services, either in their constituency or in the UK.

Only one in five of Theresa May's MPs believe there is sufficient funding for social care, with one in ten Labour MPs saying there is sufficient funding

Only one in five of Theresa May’s MPs believe there is sufficient funding for social care, with one in ten Labour MPs saying there is sufficient funding

Janet Morrison, chief executive of the charity Independent Age which commissioned the poll, said: ‘Confidence that the social care system can deal with the UK’s ageing population has virtually evaporated among parliamentarians.

‘The crisis in social care was front and centre in the election earlier this year, and it is clear from this poll that there is an overwhelming desire from politicians on all sides for the Government to work towards a cross-party consensus on a solution.

‘The Government has promised a consultation on social care, but to work this must set out a long-term vision for health and care that has support from across the political divide. It must also lead to a lasting settlement that better integrates health and social care services and is sustainable.’

In January this year three committees of MPs warned the social care crisis was at breaking point and pleaded with Theresa May to call a cross-party review of the health and care systems.

The heads of the health, public accounts and the communities and local government committees said a more fundamental, long-term solution was needed to a growing crisis.

Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb described the health and care system in England as 'creaking at the seams' 

Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb described the health and care system in England as ‘creaking at the seams’ 

The Prime Minister tried to tackle the issue of social care during the election campaign by announcing a proposal to make elderly people pay for care in their own home. But following a fierce backlash the plan was scrapped.

Instead, it was said that ministers would hold a ‘very wide consultation’ on reforming the care system, which would consider a cap and a ‘floor’ on what individuals should pay.

Commenting on the ComRes poll, Liberal Democrat health spokesman Norman Lamb said: ‘The health and care system in England is creaking at the seams.

‘While ministers have promised a green paper on the future of social care, this falls short of the fundamental review of the health and care system we desperately need.’

The Department of Health said: ‘This government is committed to improving social care in this country, which is why we have provided an additional £2billion for the sector, introduced tougher inspections to keep driving up standards and committed to consult on the future of social care to ensure sustainability in the long term.’

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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