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Pension age rise to 66 for women born in the 1950s goes to a judicial review

Pension age rise to 66 for women born in the 1950s goes to a judicial review after legal victory by campaigners

  • Women win a judicial review over the Government raising their state pension age
  • Millions of women born in the 50s have been forced to work longer than planned
  • The state pension age increased from 60 to 65, and will rise again to 66 in 2020
  • Campaigners claim the rise discriminates against women on their age and sex

A group of women furious about the Government pushing back the state pension age have won the right to a judicial review.

Millions of women born in the 1950s have been forced to work longer than planned after the state pension age increased from 60 to 65 – and to 66 in 2020. 

Many say they were not given enough notice to set aside savings.

Supporters, pictured outside the Royal Courts of Justice yesterday, believe that these women should be refunded for their lost years. A group of women furious about the Government pushing back the state pension age have won the right to a judicial review

Some claim they lost as much as £45,000 after missing out on their pension. 

Campaign group ‘BackTo60’ believes that these women should be refunded for their lost years.

Yesterday the group, which claims to have 723,500 supporters, launched a High Court challenge demanding the right to a judicial review – where a judge considers the lawfulness of a decision made by a public body.

Millions of women born in the 1950s have been forced to work longer than planned after the state pension age increased from 60 to 65 – and to 66 in 2020. Many say they were not given enough notice to set aside savings [File photo]

Millions of women born in the 1950s have been forced to work longer than planned after the state pension age increased from 60 to 65 – and to 66 in 2020. Many say they were not given enough notice to set aside savings [File photo]

In the challenge, three women, who were born between 1950 and 1953, claim the pension rise discriminates against them on the grounds of their age and sex. 

They also claim they were not properly informed of the changes in time.

The claimants say 3.8million women are affected at a cost of £5.3billion. 

Mrs Justice Lang said the case was ‘arguable’ and granted permission for their claim to proceed to a full hearing.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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