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Preschoolers as young as four are being encouraged to embrace political advocacy

Preschoolers as young as four are being taught about life on Nauru for young refugees and encouraged to embrace advocacy by teachers at daycare. 

Pupils of Brunswick Kindergarten, in Melbourne’s inner north hosted a #BlueForNauru day at school, where parents were encouraged to dress their children in blue to represent the sadness and despair those living on Nauru face.

The World Vision Australia initiative describes its mission as a call ‘for Australians to ‘go blue’ in solidarity with the children and families our nation has trapped on Nauru.’

Thousands of students across Australia walked out of class to protest a lack of action on climate change

Pupils of Brunswick Kindergarten (pictured), in Melbourne's inner north hosted a #BlueForNauru day at school, where parents were encouraged to dress their children in blue to represent the sadness and despair those living on Nauru face

Pupils of Brunswick Kindergarten (pictured), in Melbourne’s inner north hosted a #BlueForNauru day at school, where parents were encouraged to dress their children in blue to represent the sadness and despair those living on Nauru face

The programme’s introduction comes as thousands of students across Australia walked out of class to protest a lack of action on climate change – much to Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s dismay. 

‘The blue can symbolise sadness and depression – which is appropriate given the suffering these people are enduring in our name.’

Teacher Catherine Sundbye informed parents of the discussions in a newsletter, The Australian reported.

Parents were supportive of the decision, and were informed that the children were shocked and upset to learn of the living conditions in the refugee holding facility off the coast of Australia.

Children were asked: ‘What would you say to the politicians who won’t let the refugees in?’ 

Teenagers and older students rallied together in droves to protest inaction toward climate change issues on November 30

Teenagers and older students rallied together in droves to protest inaction toward climate change issues on November 30

The 'Strike 4 Climate Action' involved students from capital cities as well as upwards of 20 regional towns across Australia

The ‘Strike 4 Climate Action’ involved students from capital cities as well as upwards of 20 regional towns across Australia

Their responses were both inquisitive and accusatory, Mr Sundbye noted the standout comments included ‘you are mean to the guys that can’t come and live here’, ‘why aren’t they allowed in Australia? I don’t think they will destroy the country’, and ‘I don’t like this rule’.

Ms Sundbye said her intentions weren’t to run a scare campaign, but to educate her students.  

‘It’s never too early to get them to be part of the conversation. This is their world, their planet,’ she said.

Hundreds of students skipped school and gathered in Sydney's Martin Place, holding handmade posters condemning Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his political party

Hundreds of students skipped school and gathered in Sydney’s Martin Place, holding handmade posters condemning Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his political party

Students aged between five  and 18 rallied together in droves to protest inaction toward climate change issues on November 30.

 The ‘Strike 4 Climate Action’ involved students from capital cities as well as upwards of 20 regional towns across Australia.

Hundreds of students skipped school and gathered in Sydney’s Martin Place, holding handmade posters condemning Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his political party.

Mr Morrison told students to stay in class earlier in the week, saying children should be learning about science, math and literacy rather than advocating. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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