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Rabid hornet and massive huntsman spider in deathmatch

  • Hornet and huntsman spider have been caught on camera fighting to the death
  • Perth man Jeremy Wittber captured the fight for arachnid-insect supremacy
  • The battle between the common foes proves to be extremely one-sided 

A rabid hornet and a massive huntsman spider have been caught on camera fighting to the death in the latest battle between the common foes. 

Perth man Jeremy Wittber captured the fight for arachnid-insect supremacy while renovating his home early in the new year.

Despite both creatures holding their place among the most feared residents in a country overflowing with deadly beasts, the fight proves to be extremely one-sided.

A rabid hornet and a massive huntsman spider have been caught on camera fighting to the death in the latest battle between the common foes

The hornet is the aggressor in the interaction, repeatedly driving the spider back and stinging it as it lies on the ground.

The huntsman lashes its legs several times to attempt to keep the wasp at bay, but it is unrelenting in its attack.

It makes several attempts to flee but is continually thrown onto its back where it receives further painful stings.

The spider eventually turns to its last line of defence, curling up in a ball and playing dead, but even that does not stop the hornet.

The hornet is the aggressor in the interaction, repeatedly driving the spider back and stinging it as it lies on the ground

The hornet is the aggressor in the interaction, repeatedly driving the spider back and stinging it as it lies on the ground

The huntsman makes several attempts to flee but is continually thrown onto its back where it receives further painful stings

The huntsman makes several attempts to flee but is continually thrown onto its back where it receives further painful stings

Eventually the spider stops moving, paralysed by the series of stings from the wasp.

It lays motionless on the ground, frozen with its legs slightly extended the victor begins to drag it away.

The behaviour is not uncommon, and promises a chilling and painful ending for the huntsman.

Once back at the hornet’s nest, the spider will become a living incubator for its children, as the wasp lays its eggs inside the arachnid.

The larvae will then eat their way out of the spider, providing them with the immediate sustenance they need to grow, but a torturous end for their eight-legged prey. 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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