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Scientists develop flexible battery that can run on tears

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  • Researchers at Fudan University in China published surprising paper Thursday
  • Have developed flexible battery that uses saline solution as the electrolyte
  • Proposed as a safer alternative for wearable or implanted electrical devices
  • Could eventually be developed in batteries that run on bodily fluids 

Scientists have developed a flexible battery that could run on saline solutions such as bodily fluids such as tears, sweat or even urine.

A new paper published on Thursday by researchers at Fudan University in Shanghai, China proposes a new technique for manufacturing batteries that would replace toxic chemicals with salt water.

The batteries could for a safer way to power wearable or implanted devices, the paper published in the the journal Chem proposes.

A new paper published on Thursday by researchers at Fudan University in Shanghai, China proposes a new technique for manufacturing batteries that would replace toxic chemicals with salt water (stock photo)

Batteries typically consist of positive and negative electrodes separated by an electrolyte.

‘Most existing energy storage systems are based on strong corrosive or toxic electrolytes, posing a huge safety hazard as a result of solution leakage,’ the study authors write.

The research proposes two forms of flexible batteries: one shaped like a piece of tape with the electrodes separated by a thin sandwich layer, and one shaped like a threat with two nano-tube electrodes inside.

The replacement of toxic chemicals with saline could make the batteries ideal for power devices implanted in the human body (stock photo)

The replacement of toxic chemicals with saline could make the batteries ideal for power devices implanted in the human body (stock photo)

The scientists said that soduim sulfate, a non-toxic chemical often used in detergents, worked best as an electrolyte.

But they added that a simple saline solution, or salt water like that of bodily fluids, also performed well.

That could make the batteries ideal for implanted devices. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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