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Sydney homeowner finds the most dangerous spider in the WORLD in his apartment

Sydney homeowner finds the most dangerous spider in the WORLD in his apartment before chucking it into a container himself – as expert warns of the worst arachnid season ever

  • A Sydney homeowner found a deadly funnel web spider in his garden
  • The resident managed to place the spider in a container and took a video of it
  • ‘Is this a garden spider or something more deadly?’ he asked on Facebook
  • A spokesperson from Taronga Zoo confirmed it was a funnel web spider  

A homeowner has been given the shock of his life after he picked up a spider and put it in a container, only to discover it was the world’s most dangerous arachnid.   

Scott McGufficke, from Sydney’s north shore, posted a video of the spider to Facebook, which showed the arachnid crawling around in the container. 

‘Hey guys, we just found this spider on Park Ave, Mosman, is this just a garden spider or something more deadly?’ Mr McGufficke asked on social media. 

He later said a spokesman from Taronga Zoo confirmed it was not a garden variety spider but a deadly funnel-web. 

 

A Sydney homeowner has found the most dangerous spider in the world in his apartment and placed it inside a container himself (pictured)

Mr McGufficke was also told it was the ‘worst season’ in years and residents should exercise caution this summer. 

Funnel-web spiders, the most venomous spider in the world, can be found in eastern Australia. 

There are at least 40 species of the funnel-web spider but the most dangerous is the Atrax robustus, also known as the Sydney funnel-web.

That species is said to be responsible for all 13 recorded deaths from funnel-web bites, according to the Australian Museum.   

The funnel-web is often one centimetre to five centimetres in body length and can be either brown or black in colour. 

While not all species are said to be life-threatening, the funnel-web spider’s venom is known to be highly toxic and fast acting.  

While not all species are said to be life-threatening, the funnel-web spider's venom is known to be highly toxic and fast acting (stock image)

While not all species are said to be life-threatening, the funnel-web spider’s venom is known to be highly toxic and fast acting (stock image)

How to identify a funnel-web spider

1. Funnel-web spiders have a shiny carapace or protective shield or case

2. It has no obvious or apparent body pattern

3. A funnel-web spider’s eyes are closely grouped

4. It has a deeply curved groove or fovea 

5.  Its lower lip has short and apparent spines

6.  It has four spinnerets (silk-spinning organ of the spider)

Funnel-web spiders are often found in the moist forest areas in eastern Australia and the highlands, including Tasmania and North Queensland. 

The Sydney funnel-web spider can be found from Newcastle to Nowra and as far as Lithgow in New South Wales. 

Source: Australian Museum 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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