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The evil dog breeder accused of abusing 84 Great Danes

A ‘perfect storm’ of injury, staff shortages, a booming dog population and a sweltering heatwave caused the conditions that led police to raid the home of the so-called ‘Cruella de Vil’ dog breeder, she claimed in court on Tuesday.

And she said the only reason that cops found the floors of the house covered in dog poop was because European Great Danes react badly when confronted by large groups of unknown men.

‘They will circle around and within minutes explosive diarrhea will ensue,’ Christina Fay told the court in Ossipee, New Hampshire. ‘If they are kept in that situation this will continue until they have emptied their guts.’

Fay defended the care she gave the 75 European Great Danes that lived in her 13-bedroom home while attacking cops and animal welfare groups for seizing her pets.

But she admitted that in the days leading up to the raid, many of her dogs were kept in cages without food or water for 30 straight hours as the crisis within the house worsened, a situation she felt ‘horrible’ about.

The ‘Cruella de Vil-type’ dog breeder Christina Fay, seen here in her mug shot obtained exclusively by DailyMail.com, is accused of mistreating dozens of Great Danes in a stately mansion puppy mill is facing financial ruin and the possibility of years behind bars

The ‘Cruella de Vil-type’(left) dog breeder Christina Fay (right), seen here in her mug shot obtained exclusively by DailyMail.com, is accused of mistreating dozens of Great Danes in a stately mansion puppy mill is facing financial ruin and the possibility of years behind bars

Fay defended the care she gave the 75 European Great Danes that lived in her 13-bedroom home while attacking cops and animal welfare groups for seizing her pets in court on Tuesday

Fay defended the care she gave the 75 European Great Danes that lived in her 13-bedroom home while attacking cops and animal welfare groups for seizing her pets in court on Tuesday

The Great Danes constantly slipped on the floors because of the layer of feces that coated them. They often jumped on Fay's bed with their filthy feet

The Great Danes constantly slipped on the floors because of the layer of feces that coated them. They often jumped on Fay’s bed with their filthy feet

The mansion was covered in feces across the floors, walls and furniture, while the food preparation area was littered with raw, rotting chicken

The mansion was covered in feces across the floors, walls and furniture, while the food preparation area was littered with raw, rotting chicken

During more than 5½ hours on the stand, Fay, 59, denied she ran a puppy mill in the scenic resort town of Wolfeboro, New Hampshire, instead saying she had so many dogs purely out of love.

Speaking in a confident, firm tone, Fay portrayed herself as a caring breeder who ran her business out of love and made just 2 percent of her expenditure from selling them.

‘My expenses were $25-30,000 a month,’ Fay said. ‘In the best year I brought in $6,000.

‘I never had any aspiration to make a profit or even break even. I just wanted to share the incredible beauty and treasure I had in these dogs,’ she added, likening them to Rembrandts or Van Goghs.

‘The idea of a puppy mill is pretty much at the bottom of my dislike list,’ Fay, 59, told the court.

‘For me, of all people, to be accused of running a puppy mill is very upsetting,’ she said, adding that her dogs had just four litters in 2015, two the following year and one before her home was raided by cops and animal control officers on June 16 this year.

But she was later forced to admit that in fact 11 of her dogs gave birth in 2015.

Fay pleaded not guilty to five individual counts of animal cruelty — to dogs named Zeezee, Fantasia, Lyric, Joue and Harazah — as well as seven other charges of failing to treat papilloma, cherry eye, ear infections and conjunctivitis, feeding her dogs maggot infested chicken, leaving them without water, and keeping them in an area with a high ammonia content caused by their urine.

Wolfeboro, New Hampshire police led an 80-strong team that raided Fay's isolated eight-bed, 13-bath mansion in June

Wolfeboro, New Hampshire police led an 80-strong team that raided Fay’s isolated eight-bed, 13-bath mansion in June

Fay pleaded not guilty to five individual counts of animal cruelty — to dogs named Zeezee, Fantasia, Lyric, Joue and Harazah — as well as seven other charges of failing to treat papilloma, cherry eye, ear infections and conjunctivitis

Fay pleaded not guilty to five individual counts of animal cruelty — to dogs named Zeezee, Fantasia, Lyric, Joue and Harazah — as well as seven other charges of failing to treat papilloma, cherry eye, ear infections and conjunctivitis

While some of the 84 dogs had free rein of the house, others were kept in cages or cages off areas

While some of the 84 dogs had free rein of the house, others were kept in cages or cages off areas

Former workers said there were 'piles of trash and empty boxes covered in chicken juice. There were maggots and bugs covering the floor where some of the dogs were living'

Former workers said there were ‘piles of trash and empty boxes covered in chicken juice. There were maggots and bugs covering the floor where some of the dogs were living’

'The idea of a puppy mill is pretty much at the bottom of my dislike list,' Fay, 59, told the court.

‘The idea of a puppy mill is pretty much at the bottom of my dislike list,’ Fay, 59, told the court.

Judge Charles Greenhalgh, who was sitting without a jury, said he will deliver his verdict at a later date.

Outside the court, Lindsay Hamrick, New Hampshire state director for the Humane Society of the United States said she believed Fay should be jailed if found guilty. She faces a maximum of one year on each charge.

Hamrick said the cost of looking after the dogs since the raid has now hit $478,000. They are being kept at an undisclosed location until the judge delivers his verdict.

Fay admitted the Great Danes — which she described as ‘180 lb. black labs in disguise’ — did not always have access to water but said that was her choice because she did not believe it was good for them.

‘I had one of the best collections of European Great Danes in North America,’ she said. ‘They had a wonderful bloodline, great character and they were healthy.

‘Put all that together and you get masterpieces.’

Prosecutor Simon Brown uses a dry erase board to illustrate Fay's increase in dog population and decline in staff between 2015 and 2017 during her cross examination on Tuesday

Prosecutor Simon Brown uses a dry erase board to illustrate Fay’s increase in dog population and decline in staff between 2015 and 2017 during her cross examination on Tuesday

An image of one of Fay's dogs in projected onto the courtroom wall as her attorney Kent Barker offers testimony on her own behalf on Tuesday

An image of one of Fay’s dogs in projected onto the courtroom wall as her attorney Kent Barker offers testimony on her own behalf on Tuesday

Judge Charles Greenhalgh is illuminated by a screen as he watches videos and still frames of Fay's dogs presented by her attorney in her defense on Tuesday

Judge Charles Greenhalgh is illuminated by a screen as he watches videos and still frames of Fay’s dogs presented by her attorney in her defense on Tuesday

But when a police-led team raided the house they say they found dogs kept in filth.

Fay said there were several contributing factors. She had lost staff, one couple and their mother left to return home to Maine, a student went off to university and another helper got pregnant, she said. She brought in a new helper who quit within days saying she had hurt her back lifting a dead dog.

Fay herself had a severe knee problem that left her needing surgery. She couldn’t use crutches, she said, because the dogs thought they were toys and would grab them.

Adding to her problems the week before the raid there was an extreme heatwave, meaning all her dogs had to be brought inside.

She also said she made 289 visits to her vet in one calendar year. Each trip could take up to six hours as Dr. Kate Battenfelder’s practice was in Bartlett, New Hampshire, a 90-minute drive away. She said she would normally stop at a McDonald’s on the way back to give her dog a cheeseburger

But she agreed with prosecutor Simon Brown who said it was still her responsibility to care for the dogs properly. He pointed out that in two years the canine population in the house on Warren Sands Road had nearly doubled, rising from 40 to 75.

Brown said all eight samples taken from feces in the house after the raid tested positive for the parasite giardia, which causes diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss and lethargy.

He suggested it had been passed on to the humans caring for the dogs as they all had attacks of diarrhea at the time.

Brown said all eight samples taken from feces in the house after the raid tested positive for the parasite giardia, which causes diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss and lethargy.

Brown said all eight samples taken from feces in the house after the raid tested positive for the parasite giardia, which causes diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss and lethargy.

Prosecutor Simon Brown pointed out that in two years the canine population in the house on Warren Sands Road had nearly doubled, rising from 40 to 75

Prosecutor Simon Brown pointed out that in two years the canine population in the house on Warren Sands Road had nearly doubled, rising from 40 to 75

At a previous hearing in October, teenage worker Annie-Rose Newell (pictured) told the court that the conditions at Fay's home were 'shocking'

At a previous hearing in October, teenage worker Annie-Rose Newell (pictured) told the court that the conditions at Fay’s home were ‘shocking’

A second kennel worker, Marilyn Kelly (pictured), told the court in October that the situation at the house on Warren Sands Road in Wolfeboro was 'out of control'

A second kennel worker, Marilyn Kelly (pictured), told the court in October that the situation at the house on Warren Sands Road in Wolfeboro was ‘out of control’

Fay said on the day of the raid she had opened the door to be faced by a semi-circle of officers with rifles pointing at the house. She said Police Officer Michael Strauch grabbed her by the arm and pulled her outside.

‘I started talking a mile a minute,’ she said. ‘I truly don’t remember what I said, then he said: ‘Right, you’re getting two sets of handcuffs.’

She said her son, Ned, one of six children she adopted at birth all with problems caused by their mother’s alcohol or drug addiction, soon called her to tell her he had been summarily fired from his job at a market because police had gone to his jobsite and told his boss he was likely infected with giardia.

‘I don’t even know how to spell the word dignity anymore,’ she said, when asked about her own diarrhea. ‘I have nothing left.’

Fay said she realized she had made a huge mistake when she moved to Wolfeboro from her previous home in Maine.

‘I remember writing to my attorney and telling him it felt like we had landed in a Stephen King town where they are so unwelcoming,’ she said. ‘It has never been warm and fuzzy here.’

Fay said on the day of the raid she had opened the door to be faced by a semi-circle of officers with rifles pointing at the house. She said Police Officer Michael Strauch grabbed her by the arm and pulled her outside

Fay said on the day of the raid she had opened the door to be faced by a semi-circle of officers with rifles pointing at the house. She said Police Officer Michael Strauch grabbed her by the arm and pulled her outside

'I started talking a mile a minute,' she said. 'I truly don't remember what I said, then he said: 'Right, you're getting two sets of handcuffs.'

‘I started talking a mile a minute,’ she said. ‘I truly don’t remember what I said, then he said: ‘Right, you’re getting two sets of handcuffs.’

Fay, a former veterinary technician at the Bronx Zoo in New York, said she bought the house on 54 acres because she thought it would give her plenty of space

Fay, a former veterinary technician at the Bronx Zoo in New York, said she bought the house on 54 acres because she thought it would give her plenty of space

The dogs were seized in June after complaints about Fay's business — which she called De La Sang Monde, the French for World Blood 

The dogs were seized in June after complaints about Fay’s business — which she called De La Sang Monde, the French for World Blood 

Fay, a former veterinary technician at the Bronx Zoo in New York, said she bought the house on 54 acres because she thought it would give her plenty of space.

But within 36 hours of moving in she got her first complaint about barking and from then on had to abandon the specially-built gardens complete with air conditioned kennels that she had spent thousands on to house the dogs.

Instead, she said, she had to move them inside the huge house to cut down on the noise her neighbors could hear.

The dogs were seized in June after complaints about Fay’s business — which she called De La Sang Monde, the French for World Blood — based in the huge mansion close to picturesque Wentworth Lake.

She bought the 13,000 sq. ft. home for $1.525 million in 2015. The real estate listing at the time called it a ‘custom built, recently improved, 8 master suite home’ which included ‘a lovely 4 room Au Pair suite, a fabulous gourmet kitchen with marble counter tops, 2 islands, large walk in pantry and stainless steel appliances, a cherry paneled library, an amazing home theater room, beautiful marble baths, gleaming hardwood floors and all the amenities you would expect from a home of this quality and caliber.’

But the house was trashed by the sheer number of dogs kept by blue-blooded Fay — whose grandmother married famed financier E.F. Hutton when she was 28 and he was 60 and following Hutton’s death went on to become a viscountess after marrying a member of the British cabinet.

It has now been declared unfit for human habitation.

Fay told Judge Greenhalgh that she had the means — and the ability — to indulge her passion for the dogs. Once her children had grown she decided to start importing European Great Danes and selling them.

Fay told Judge Greenhalgh (pictured) that she had the means — and the ability — to indulge her passion for the dogs. Once her children had grown she decided to start importing European Great Danes and selling them. 

Fay told Judge Greenhalgh (pictured) that she had the means — and the ability — to indulge her passion for the dogs. Once her children had grown she decided to start importing European Great Danes and selling them. 

She said the dogs suffer from a lot of health problems and have an average life expectancy of only around six years, although occasionally they can live to eight or nine.

She said the dogs suffer from a lot of health problems and have an average life expectancy of only around six years, although occasionally they can live to eight or nine.

Fay (pictured) said the dogs suffer from a lot of health problems and have an average life expectancy of only around six years

Fay (pictured, hugging a defense team member) expressly denied her house was filthy

Fay (pictured, left and right) said the dogs suffer from a lot of health problems and have an average life expectancy of only around six years, but she expressly denied her house was filthy

‘They are dear, loving, dedicated, loyal dogs that just want to be loved and to love,’ Fay said.

She said the dogs suffer from a lot of health problems and have an average life expectancy of only around six years, although occasionally they can live to eight or nine.

But she expressly denied the house was filthy. When her attorney Kent Barker produced photos and videos of the dogs appearing happy she denied that dirt on the walls and floors was feces.

‘It is mud they brought in from outside,’ she said, before adding that the walls were cleaned daily.

At a previous hearing in October, teenage worker Annie-Rose Newell told the court that the conditions at Fay’s home were ‘shocking.’

‘I felt horrible for the dogs that had to live in those conditions, Newell, 17, said, according to the Concord Monitor.

Newell had got a job at Fay’s mansion, hoping to fulfill her wish to work with animals. But she quit after just one day because of the conditions the dogs were kept in.

She said the Great Danes constantly slipped on the floors because of the layer of feces that coated them. Hey often jumped on Fay’s bed with their filthy feet. ‘Everything that was on the floor was being transferred onto her bed,’ she said.

Fay strains to recall ansers to her attorney's questions while defending herself on Tuesday

Fay strains to recall ansers to her attorney’s questions while defending herself on Tuesday

Bam-Bam, cast off by Fay before the police raid, currently in rehab at the Conway Area Humane Society

Bam-Bam, cast off by Fay before the police raid, currently in rehab at the Conway Area Humane Society

Della, cast off by Fay before the police raid, currently in rehab at the Conway Area Humane Society

Della, cast off by Fay before the police raid, currently in rehab at the Conway Area Humane Society

Newell said even had problems staying upright herself because of the floor was so slick it was like an ice rink.

Maggots infested the chicken pieces kept in the refrigerator, Newell added.

‘Maggots just poured out from the door and down on to the ground,’ the teen said, adding that the Fay family had offered to let her eat her lunch with them in the house. ‘But I decided to go to my car,’ she said.

‘I could not eat anything that day. I had to do all I could to help with the dogs.

‘I am not a person who’s prone to crying or emotions,’ Newell added. ‘But I immediately just started crying. I couldn’t breathe.’

Newell took photos on her single day on the job and handed them over to the Humane Society of the United States, beginning the process which ended with Fay being charged.

A second kennel worker, Marilyn Kelly told the court in October that the situation at the house on Warren Sands Road in Wolfeboro was ‘out of control.’

She said at one point she could not work because she injured her back lifting a dead dog.

Kelly complained to veterinarian Battenfelder, who, instead of helping, immediately reported back to Fay, said Kelly.

‘That created quite a scene,’ said Kelly, who said Fay was ‘furious’ with her.

Battenfelder invoked her Fifth Amendment rights to prevent her being called as a witness for the defense.

But at Tuesday’s hearing Fay defended the veterinarian. ‘I have complete trust in her and great respect for her,’ she said.

Worker Marilyn Kelly complained about the house conditions to veterinarian Battenfelder, who, instead of helping, immediately reported back to Fay (pictured, left, Tuesday), said Kelly

Worker Marilyn Kelly complained about the house conditions to veterinarian Battenfelder, who, instead of helping, immediately reported back to Fay (pictured, left, Tuesday), said Kelly

Worker Newell took photos on her single day on the job and handed them over to the Humane Society of the United States, beginning the process which ended with Fay being charged.

Worker Newell took photos on her single day on the job and handed them over to the Humane Society of the United States, beginning the process which ended with Fay being charged.

Worker Marilyn Kelly said the dogs were only let out of their cages, where they had no water, for 15 minutes a day. They were fed just once a day

Worker Marilyn Kelly said the dogs were only let out of their cages, where they had no water, for 15 minutes a day. They were fed just once a day

In her statement taken at the time of the raid on Fay's house, Kelly said she had seen Fay stapled a dog's wound without antibiotics after it got involved in a fight

In her statement taken at the time of the raid on Fay’s house, Kelly said she had seen Fay stapled a dog’s wound without antibiotics after it got involved in a fight

In her statement taken at the time of the raid on Fay’s house, Kelly said she had seen Fay stapled a dog’s wound without antibiotics after it got involved in a fight.

‘She said dogs that are prescribed medications are rarely given the medication for the directed time and only get it for one to two days at most.

‘There are dogs with open sores from ‘Happy Tail’ where the tail hits the kennel and cuts open and doesn’t heal,’ wrote Strauch. ‘She advised that one room is covered in blood from 8 dogs that have the condition.

Kelly said the dogs were only let out of their cages, where they had no water, for 15 minutes a day. They were fed just once a day. ‘There are no windows and no interaction. The room burns your eyes from the urine.

‘More than half the dogs in the house have liquid stool and it is common to see them vomiting as well.’

In her statement, the teenage Newell told Officer Strauch of her disgust at the conditions she discovered in the isolated 8-bed, 13-bath mansion.

Fay reacts to cross examination by Prosecutor Simon Brown on Tuesday at the Carrol County Courthouse in Ossipee, New Hampshire

Fay reacts to cross examination by Prosecutor Simon Brown on Tuesday at the Carrol County Courthouse in Ossipee, New Hampshire

Caesar, cast off by Fay before the police raid, currently in rehab at the Conway Area Humane Society

Caesar, cast off by Fay before the police raid, currently in rehab at the Conway Area Humane Society

On her only day at work, May 2, Annie Newell was horrified by what she found and immediately started taking pictures on her phone

On her only day at work, May 2, Annie Newell was horrified by what she found and immediately started taking pictures on her phone

Newell had been recruited by kennel manager Julia Smith, the police file revealed. On her only day at work, May 2, she was horrified by what she found and immediately started taking pictures on her phone, which were used as evidence against Fay.

Newell — who was referred to in the police report only by her initials as she was just 16 at the time — told police as soon as she went to Fay’s home on Warren Sands Road in Wolfeboro, she was met by a smell which made her ‘want to gag.’

She told Strauch there were ‘piles of trash and empty boxes covered in chicken juice. There were maggots and bugs covering the floor where some of the dogs were living.’

‘Once inside the house, A.N. stated that it was hard to walk as the feces and urine had created a thick layer on the floors. A.N. advised the dogs had a hard time standing as well.

The teen said she was shocked by the area where chicken for the dogs was prepared.

Fay and her attorney Kent Barker discuss pictures taken by investigaters of her home which show feces covered floors on Tuesday

Fay and her attorney Kent Barker discuss pictures taken by investigaters of her home which show feces covered floors on Tuesday

Fay kept her favorite dogs in her bedroom, Strauch's report revealed. 'In Fay's bedroom the dogs were on the bed and there were feces everywhere

Fay kept her favorite dogs in her bedroom, Strauch’s report revealed. ‘In Fay’s bedroom the dogs were on the bed and there were feces everywhere

At Tuesday's hearing Fay said that cherry eye is a condition common to European Great Danes that is not serious and can often be left untreated

At Tuesday’s hearing Fay said that cherry eye is a condition common to European Great Danes that is not serious and can often be left untreated

Worker Annie Newell '.saw many dogs with severely swollen legs and feet and one dog that had such bad 'Cherry Eye' that it couldn't see

Newell advised they let the dogs out and all they wanted to do was drink 'puddle water,' according to a report

Worker Annie Newell ‘.saw many dogs with severely swollen legs and feet and one dog that had such bad ‘Cherry Eye’ that it couldn’t see. [She] advised they let the dogs out and all they wanted to do was drink ‘puddle water,’ according to a report

‘The counters were covered in old chicken parts and chicken juice was running off the counter on to the floor,’ wrote Strauch. ‘The buckets that were used for feeding were not cleaned out from previous feedings. There was also a meat grinder on the counter that was not clean.’

Newell, who was paid $80 for her one day of work, told cops she saw dogs defecating on the floor inside the house while unconcerned Fay watched them.

‘A.N. counted at least 25 Great Danes in one room alone,’ wrote Strauch. Many other rooms were ‘filled with dogs.’

But Fay kept her favorite dogs in her bedroom, Strauch’s report revealed. ‘In Fay’s bedroom the dogs were on the bed and there were feces everywhere. In the master bedroom there was a litter of Great Dane puppies. They were so young that their eyes hadn’t yet opened.’

When kennel manager Julia Smith took Newell to the ‘hot and stuffy’ basement, she told the teen the dogs ‘needed to go out today because they didn’t go out yesterday and they only get water when they go outside.’

‘A.N. saw many dogs with severely swollen legs and feet and one dog that had such bad ‘Cherry Eye’ that it couldn’t see. A.N. advised they let the dogs out and all they wanted to do was drink ‘puddle water.’

At Tuesday’s hearing Fay said that cherry eye is a condition common to European Great Danes that is not serious and can often be left untreated. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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