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The new lottery law that will make it harder to win huge jackpots – ahead of $80million draw 

Their numbers are up: The new lottery law that will make it harder to win huge jackpots – ahead of $80million draw

  • A new law has been implemented that will make it harder for Aussies to win big
  • From today, Australians are no longer able to place bets on lottery outcomes 
  • The process is generally known as ‘jackpot betting’ or ‘synthetic lotteries’  

A new law has been implemented that will make it harder for Australians to win big in the lottery.

From today, Australians are no longer able to place bets on the outcome of lottery syndicates – otherwise known as ‘jackpot betting’. 

While regular lottery draws, including the record-breaking $80million draw scheduled for Thursday night, will not be affected, the process of betting on international or high-profile jackpots will no longer exist.

A new law has been implemented that will make it harder for Australians to win big in the lottery

The new law comes as both US Mega Millions and Powerball continue to work on making it illegal for the sale of their tickets outside of the United States through third party lottery systems.

The federal government initially proposed the law amendments in June of 2018, after suggestions that the synthetic lotteries drove away customers from the traditional means of buying lottery tickets.

The system encourages punters to bet on the outcome of draws without physically buying a ticket, and is generally run through separate entities altogether.

From today, Australians are no longer able to place bets on the outcome of lottery syndicates - otherwise known as 'jackpot betting'

From today, Australians are no longer able to place bets on the outcome of lottery syndicates – otherwise known as ‘jackpot betting’

One in three Australians are expected to try their hand at winning the jackpot, but the draw closes at 7.30pm AEST on Thursday, January 10 

One in three Australians are expected to try their hand at winning the jackpot, but the draw closes at 7.30pm AEST on Thursday, January 10 

Any money won, which generally mirrors the winnings of the actual draw, is paid out by the independent entity, such as Lottoland, not the official lottery operator. 

Australian Lottery and Newsagents Association CEO Adam Joy previously explained why he supported the ban.

‘ALNA has been very firm in our stance against lotto betting for a long time,’ he said.

‘The lotto betting model encourages highly repetitive bets that may risk problem gambling, promote higher risk spending, and may be misleading regarding the winnings available.

‘This increases risk and it comes at a significant cost to state taxes, and to local family-run small businesses — that employ locally, pay Australian taxes and support the local community.’

Thursday’s $80million Powerball is the second-largest in Australian history.

One in three Australians are expected to try their hand at winning the jackpot, but the draw closes at 7.30pm AEST on Thursday, January 10.

The system encourages punters to bet on the outcome of draws without physically buying a ticket, and is generally run through separate entities altogether

The system encourages punters to bet on the outcome of draws without physically buying a ticket, and is generally run through separate entities altogether



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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