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16-year-old Sydneysider is admitted to ICU with Covid-19

A 16-year-old has been admitted to intensive care after contracting Covid-19 in Sydney. 

Reports suggest the teen is now fighting for life on a ventilator at St George Hospital but Daily Mail Australia has not been able to confirm this with NSW Health.

The shocking news comes just 24 hours after a 27-year-old newly-wed tragically died after being struck down by the highly infectious Indian Delta strain.

‘NSW Health can confirm there is one person in their teens currently in Intensive Care,’ the department said on Wednesday. 

Reports suggest the teen is now fighting for life on a ventilator at St George Hospital (pictured) but Daily Mail Australia has not been able to confirm this with NSW Health

Daily Mail Australia revealed that a young man who died in the shower while suffering from Covid was anxious about getting vaccinated because he feared it could have long-term side effects. 

Ady Al-Askar collapsed on Tuesday afternoon and was unable to be revived.

The 27-year-old had been isolating in his Liverpool unit in Sydney’s southwest with his wife, Yasmin, an aged care nurse who first contracted the virus and brought it home from work.

The couple were due to end their 14-day mandatory quarantine period on Wednesday and relatives are now questioning whether Covid contributed to his death. 

Heart conditions reportedly run in the Al-Askar family, and his cousin, Khalid Thijeel, told Daily Mail Australia he believed it was this that cost the man his life, not the virus. 

The 27-year-old had been isolating in his Liverpool unit in Sydney's southwest with his aged care nurse wife, Yasmin, who first contracted the virus and brought it home from work

The 27-year-old had been isolating in his Liverpool unit in Sydney’s southwest with his aged care nurse wife, Yasmin, who first contracted the virus and brought it home from work

Pictured: Mr Al-Askar on his wedding day, just six weeks ago

Pictured: Mr Al-Askar on his wedding day, just six weeks ago

Mr Thijeel said his cousin, a factory worker, had not yet been vaccinated despite government directives for all Sydneysiders – particularly those living in hotspots – to get the jab. 

He said given his youth, Mr Al-Askar mistakenly didn’t consider getting the jab a priority.

He was also wary of potential long-term effects the newly developed vaccine might have. 

Pictured: Ady Al-Askar

Pictured: Ady Al-Askar

Mr Thijeel stressed his cousin was not an ‘anti vaxxer’, but was hesitant after mixed messaging from the Federal Government which initially told Australians the AstraZeneca jab was not safe for people under the age of 60.

‘He was young, and it’s my understanding he wanted to see what long-term effects there were… he doesn’t have children yet, but would it affect them’,’ he said.

‘He was just waiting to see’.  

The Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation’s latest advice states that increased transmissibility of the Delta variant outweighs any minor risks associated with the AstraZeneca jab. 

‘In a large outbreak, the benefits of the COVID-19 vaccine AstraZeneca are greater than the risk of rare side effects for all age groups,’ the advice states.

‘ATAGI reiterates that all adults in greater Sydney should strongly consider the benefits of earlier protection with COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca rather than waiting for alternative vaccines.’  

Six Australians have died as a result of developing blood clots after receiving their AstraZeneca jab, out of about 12.3million doses administered. 

Meanwhile 17 people have died as a result of the current Covid outbreak in NSW.  

How the government’s health advice has changed regarding vaccinations 

When the vaccine rollout began, Prime Minister Scott Morrison was confident in the way the nation was managing the pandemic that he publicly declared: ‘It’s not a race’.

Those comments came back to haunt him just months later when the highly-infectious Delta variant of Covid crept through our strict border protocols.

Since then, he’s very much so confirmed that it IS a race against time, and, as a result, the messaging has been confusing for some.

Initially, the AstraZeneca vaccine was rolled out only for people over the age of 60. The health advice stated it was not safe for younger people to have this vaccine, due to an extremely low risk of blood clotting.

AZ is Australia’s primary vaccine supply, followed by Pfizer, which was publicly lauded as the safer option for young people.

In response to the increased threat of the Delta variant, this advice has changed several times.

The most up to date advice is this: ‘In a large outbreak, the benefits of the COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca are greater than the risk of rare side effects for all age groups.

‘ATAGI reiterates that all adults in greater Sydney should strongly consider the benefits of earlier protection with COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca rather than waiting for alternative vaccines.’  

Pfizer is largely considered the preferable option among certain demographics, but is not as easy to source as the AstraZeneca. 

Mr Al-Askar’s death makes him the youngest victim of the virus in New South Wales to date.    

New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejikilian and chief health officer Kerry Chant said his tragic death served as a stark warning that the Delta variant did not age discriminate.

Government officials at a state and federal level are now urging all Sydneysiders to get vaccinated as soon as possible. 

Young people were initially not considered a priority age group under the government rollout. 

Mr Al-Askar's cousin Khalid Thijeel (pictured together) said the family are not certain he died of Covid-19, despite what authorities have told them

Mr Al-Askar’s cousin Khalid Thijeel (pictured together) said the family are not certain he died of Covid-19, despite what authorities have told them

Pictured: ICU staff caring for COVID-19 positive patients at St Vincent's Hospital in Sydney, Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Pictured: ICU staff caring for COVID-19 positive patients at St Vincent’s Hospital in Sydney, Tuesday, July 13, 2021

But Ms Berejiklian has since warned the Delta variant is spreading rampantly within young communities and repeatedly said that an increasing amount of under-40s are in hospital after contracting the virus. 

‘This disease is lethal and it affects people of all ages,’ Ms Berejiklian said on Wednesday.

‘We can’t stress how important it is to come forward and get vaccinated. If you are vaccinated you are staying out of hospital, staying out of the ICU and helping to reduce the spread of the virus.’

Dr Chant said Mr Al-Askar was being cared for by the local health district but ‘suddenly deteriorated’. 

‘He was being checked daily and he did complain of feeling a little fatigued but the deterioration happened suddenly, is my understanding. We are aware that with Covid you can get sudden deaths.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk