600 patients are recalled to hospital after shoulder operations left some unable to use their arms

An orthopaedic surgeon has been suspended and nearly 600 patients recalled amid concerns over botched shoulder operations.

The Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust, in West Midlands, is reaching out to hundreds of Dr Mian Munawar Shah’s former patients after a procedure he performed reportedly caused some people to lose use of their arms.

The hospital says hundreds of patients could be affected by Mr Shah’s surgery and has established a helpline for those individuals, BBC reported.

Twenty-one medical negligence claims related to the surgery were filed between 2010 and 2018.

Walsall Healthcare Trust contacted the Royal College of Surgeons in 2010 to carry out a general review of surgery. 

The organisation further reviewed Mr Shah’s individual work and recommended a recall of his patients.

The Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust (pictured) has contacted nearly 600 of Dr Mian Munawar Shah’s (not pictured) patients over concerns about his shoulder surgeries

The Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service (MPTS) gave Mr Shah an interim order to stop doing laterjet procedures or shoulder joint replacements without supervision last year.

The High Court has since extended the interim measures that were imposed on the doctor in 2021. However, complaints against Mr Shah pre-date the action taken against him.

Mr Shah privately operated on Joanne Aldridge in 2010 at a facility operated by Spire Healthcare. 

During the procedure, her radial nerve was severed, leaving her with terrible pain and the inability to lift her arm. The trust admitted liability and Ms Aldridge received compensation.

However, in 2016 – about six years after her operation – she wrote to the General Medical Council’s (GMC) fitness to practise department and requested an investigation into Mr Shah.

‘I tried to stop him because I knew that I wasn’t the first and I wouldn’t be the last,’ Ms Aldridge told BBC. ‘I tried to get something done so others didn’t have their lives ruined.’

The GMC declined to investigate, citing the fact that Ms Aldridge’s operation had occurred more than five years prior. 

The entity also reportedly noted Walsall trust had given Mr Shah a clean bill of health during a revalidation process in 2014.

Mr Shah privately operated on Joanne Aldridge (pictured) in 2010 at a facility operated by Spire Healthcare. During the procedure, her radial nerve was severed, leaving her with terrible pain and the inability to lift her arm

Mr Shah privately operated on Joanne Aldridge (pictured) in 2010 at a facility operated by Spire Healthcare. During the procedure, her radial nerve was severed, leaving her with terrible pain and the inability to lift her arm

Martin Crowley (pictured) underwent an operation after dislocating his shoulder in 2019. Mr Shah replaced his join after the first surgery was unsuccessful. Mr Crowley says that since the operation he has struggled to complete basic tasks, such as holding a cup of tea or buttoning his shirt

Martin Crowley (pictured) underwent an operation after dislocating his shoulder in 2019. Mr Shah replaced his join after the first surgery was unsuccessful. Mr Crowley says that since the operation he has struggled to complete basic tasks, such as holding a cup of tea or buttoning his shirt

Patient Angela Glover, who underwent two of Mr Shah’s operations, lives in ‘constant pain’ as a result of his procedures, which left her unable to raise her arm or grip things in her right hand.

Ms Glover underwent two of the doctor’s operations, including one that was later deemed unnecessary during which Mr Shah inappropriately placed a screw.

Her family has demanded an explanation since her problems started developing, but still feel in the dark. 

‘We’ve had to fight and demand every step of the way and I’m still not sure we’ve been told what’s happened – we’ve still not had any proper explanation,’ her partner Simon Roberts told the TV network.

He also noted the affects of the surgeries have negatively impacted Ms Glover’s mental health to the point of a suicide attempt. 

Mr Roberts said: ‘Angela’s not confident to hold a baby and that’s very frustrating if you can’t pick your grandchildren up and hold them.

‘I see the tears in her eyes sometimes and that breaks my heart too.’

Similarly, Martin Crowley underwent an operation after dislocating his shoulder in 2019. Mr Shah replaced his join after the first surgery was unsuccessful.

Mr Crowley says that since the operation he has struggled to complete basic tasks, such as holding a cup of tea or buttoning his shirt. 

‘It’s affecting me quite bad, there’s a lot of stuff I want to do that I can’t do,’ he said.

Angela Glover (not pictured), who underwent two of Mr Shah's operations, lives in 'constant pain' as a result of his procedures, which left her unable to raise her arm or grip things in her right hand

Angela Glover (not pictured), who underwent two of Mr Shah’s operations, lives in ‘constant pain’ as a result of his procedures, which left her unable to raise her arm or grip things in her right hand

Ms Glover's partner Simon Roberts (pictured) said: 'We've had to fight and demand every step of the way and I'm still not sure we've been told what's happened - we've still not had any proper explanation'

Ms Glover’s partner Simon Roberts (pictured) said: ‘We’ve had to fight and demand every step of the way and I’m still not sure we’ve been told what’s happened – we’ve still not had any proper explanation’

The impacted patients and their loved ones are now asking why it took so long for officials to take action against Mr Shah. 

Walsall trust medical director Dr Manjeet Shehmar suggested it may be partially connected to the fact that the trust failed to carry out multi-disciplinary team meetings.

Some of Mr Shah’s procedures would have been performed at Walsall Manor but others would have occurred in a specialist orthopaedic hospital.

Walsall chief executive David Loughton, who took over last year, also said the trust was not aware of any issues tied to Mr Shah’s surgery on knee or hip joints. 

Mr Loughton did apologise to the affected patients, some of whom he ‘personally met with.’

‘I am acutely aware of the debilitating effects that this has had on them and how in a lot of cases it has changed their lives,’ he shared.

Meantime Spire Healthcare is working closely with Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust during its review of Mr Shah’s practice and will continue to do so. 

‘We are reviewing whether we need to contact and offer support to patients who had particular treatments with Mr Shah at Spire,’ a spokesperson said, noting that the doctor hadn’t worked at their facility since March 2020.

‘We understand the distress and uncertainty this may cause to patients. Patient safety and the quality of the care we provide to patients remains Spire Healthcare’s highest priority.’

Mr Shah’s solicitor declined BBC’s request for comment, alleging it would be ‘inappropriate’ to issue remarks while matters are ongoing. 

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