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Activists fear Ben Nevis being flooded with rubbish as 17lb of banana skins are found on its slopes

Activists fear Ben Nevis is being turned into a rubbish dump after 17 pounds of BANANA SKINS were removed from its slopes in just two days

  • Large masses of rubbish are being found on Britain’s highest slope – Ben Nevis 
  • Last week, 17lb of banana skins were collected on the mountain by volunteers
  • This followed the reported removal of almost 375 lb of rubbish last October  

Discarded banana skins and other litter is turning Britain’s highest mountain into a rubbish dump, say campaigners.

Last week 17lb of banana skins – which can take up to two years to degrade – were collected from the slopes of Ben Nevis during a two-day litter pick.

It followed the removal of almost 375lb of rubbish last October, with more bizarre items including half a toilet, a military flare and underpants.

Discarded banana skins and other litter is turning Britain’s highest mountain into a rubbish dump, say campaigners. Richard Pyne (pictured) collects rubbish on the slopes

The John Muir Trust, which manages visitor impact on Ben Nevis, said the popularity of the 4,411ft Highland peak had surged, with visitor numbers up from 120,000 to 160,000 last year.

Alison Austin, the charity’s Ben Nevis manager, welcomed the increase, but said such huge numbers were having ‘a serious impact on the mountain’.

Last week 17lb of banana skins ¿ which can take up to two years to degrade ¿ were collected from the slopes of Ben Nevis during a two-day litter pick

Last week 17lb of banana skins – which can take up to two years to degrade – were collected from the slopes of Ben Nevis during a two-day litter pick

‘We know that more experienced hillwalkers understand they should leave nothing behind but their boot prints,’ she added.

‘But more casual visitors are less likely to be aware, for example, that banana skins can take up to two years to degrade, which is not just unsightly but can also damage the mountain’s fragile ecosystem.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk