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Adolescent dolphins play ‘catch’ with puffer fish off coast of South Africa

Amazing moment a group of adolescent dolphins play ‘catch’ with lethal puffer fish and even bite its poisonous skin in order to get high

  • Dolphins were being filmed off coast of South Africa for wildlife documentary
  • The ‘teenage’ mammals caught hold of puffers and started throwing it about
  • They even chewed on flesh of the poisonous creature in order to ‘get high’

This is the incredible moment a group of teenage dolphins throw around a poisonous puffer fish and even chew on its skin to ‘get high’.

It is claimed that adolescent bottlenoses have recently taken up the activity after discovering the much smaller creature’s narcotic effect.

The group of young dolphins were filmed surfing off the coast of South Africa.

They had reportedly been turfed out of their family pod by the females for being ‘too unruly’. 

At an average of two years old, the males have come together to form gangs the travel the sea looking for excitement and other creatures to interact with. 

In the footage, filmed for the BBC programme Spy In The Wild, robotic spy fish packed with cameras are sent into a group of teenagers to record their activities.

At an average of two years old, the males have come together to form gangs the travel the sea looking for excitement and other creatures to interact with

A real puffer fish appears out of the deep blue, and at first receives similar rough treatment before even being flung across the water's surface.

A real puffer fish appears out of the deep blue, and at first receives similar rough treatment before even being flung across the water’s surface.

They use both a turtle and a puffer fish, but given how rowdy the males are the cameras quickly go flying. 

But then suddenly a real puffer fish appears out of the deep blue, and at first receives similar rough treatment before even being flung across the water’s surface.

Then, one by one, the dolphins hold the puffer fish in their mouths, making sure not to swallow or otherwise kill the small creature. 

One by one, the dolphins hold the puffer fish in their mouths, making sure not to swallow or otherwise kill the small creature

One by one, the dolphins hold the puffer fish in their mouths, making sure not to swallow or otherwise kill the small creature

Puffers contain a powerful nerve agent called tetrodotoxin, which is poisonous in even a small quantity to kill a human

Puffers contain a powerful nerve agent called tetrodotoxin, which is poisonous in even a small quantity to kill a human

Puffers contain a powerful nerve agent called tetrodotoxin, which is poisonous in even a small quantity to kill a human.

The dolphins’ moods appear to change, with their swimming become more creative as they ‘pass the puffer’ around the group.

After continuing for some time, the dolphins release the small fish which to wander confused but unharmed.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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