News, Culture & Society

Airlines have been slapped with just 630 fines for not checking passengers’ Covid forms

Airlines have only been fined 630 times for allowing passengers to fly without the right paperwork despite more than 12,000 people being caught on arrival into the UK since February, it was revealed today.

Carriers have been blamed for the chaos and delays of up to six hours at passport control at Heathrow because so many people arriving in the UK haven’t had valid proof of a recent negative coronavirus test or a completed Passenger Locator Form.

Airlines, which are meant to check all documents before they board, face fines of £2,000 for each passenger they carry to England without the proper paperwork while passengers can be fined £500 if they do not have the documents.

Border experts have told MailOnline that a two minute processing time at passport control becomes 40 minutes if just one piece of paperwork is wrong. There are concerns the situation will get worse if travel opens up on May 17.

Airlines can also be fined £4,000 for failing to inform passengers of the requirements before departure and during the journey, and £2,000 if they carry passengers who have been in a red list country in the previous 10 days to a non-designated port.  Fines are issued by the Civil Aviation Authority.

Carriers have already suffered a severe financial hit from the collapse in demand for air travel.

Airlines have only been fined 630 times for allowing passengers to fly without the right paperwork despite more than 12,000 being caught since February, which has caused continued chaos at Heathrow’s passport control

Airlines face fines of £2,000 for each passenger they carry to England without the proper paperwork while passengers can be fined £500 if they do not have the documents

Airlines face fines of £2,000 for each passenger they carry to England without the proper paperwork while passengers can be fined £500 if they do not have the documents

Covid passports for holidays to US, France, Italy and Germany ‘could be in place by June’ – as Spain throws open its beaches and Greece ‘will allow Brits to show handwritten NHS cards as proof of jab’ 

Covid passports for summer holidays could be in place by June with UK-EU talks to resume travel set to start in days, officials have suggested.

Vaccinated Brits with Covid passports could holiday in the US, France, Italy and Germany by June 28, it was revealed, though Greece insists the handwritten paper NHS card handed out with a jab will suffice.

Spain also confirmed last night it was looking forward to welcoming back British holidaymakers and said June would be the start of the ‘recovery’ for tourism.

The EU is closing in on a deal with the US for Covid passports, with officials also saying they are open to a similar policy with the UK.

In response, a UK government spokesman said Britain was also ready to open talks with the EU shortly.

The spokesman said: ‘Ensuring free and open travel with our European partners is vitally important which is why we will be engaging the European commission on reopening travel routes from the UK shortly.’

Revealing Spain was throwing open its becahes, tourism minister Fernando Valdes Verelst said: ‘June will be the start of the recovery of tourism in Spain. By then, we will have a digital vaccination certificate in place and we will be able to reopen our borders.’

He said Spain was pushing for the UK’s digital vaccine passport to be ‘mutually recognised’ and that he welcomed Boris Johnson’s plans to restart international travel.

Speaking at the World Travel and Tourism Councilin Mexico, he added: ‘Because of the progress in our vaccine rollout with 22 per cent of our population having had their first dose already, we expect by June to be at the green light.

‘We are having close conversations with UK authorities and we are exchanging information on Spain’s digital system and the trial happening at our airports in May.’

The DfT said the fines ‘form part of the UK’s tough border measures to protect the UK as the vaccine rollout continues to make progress’.

It added that Border Force is ‘currently checking every individual coming into the country, no matter where they have come from, and will continue to carry out thorough checks at the border to keep the public safe’.

Earlier this month, a Heathrow executive said arriving passengers were being forced to queue for up to six hours due to checks at the border. Chief solutions officer Chris Garton told MPs that ‘the situation is becoming untenable’ and the police have been forced to step in.

Covid passports for summer holidays could be in place by June with UK-EU talks to resume travel set to start in days, officials have suggested.

Vaccinated Brits with Covid passports could holiday in the US, France, Italy and Germany by June 28, it was revealed, though Greece insists the handwritten paper NHS card handed out with a jab will suffice. 

Spain also confirmed last night it was looking forward to welcoming back British holidaymakers and said June would be the start of the ‘recovery’ for tourism. 

The EU is closing in on a deal with the US on Covid passports, with officials also saying they are open to a similar policy with the UK. 

In response, a UK government spokesman said Britain was also ready to open talks with the EU shortly.

The spokesman said: ‘Ensuring free and open travel with our European partners is vitally important which is why we will be engaging the European commission on reopening travel routes from the UK shortly.’ 

Revealing Spain was throwing open its becahes, tourism minister Fernando Valdes Verelst said: ‘June will be the start of the recovery of tourism in Spain. By then, we will have a digital vaccination certificate in place and we will be able to reopen our borders.’

He said Spain was pushing for the UK’s digital vaccine passport to be ‘mutually recognised’ and that he welcomed Boris Johnson’s plans to restart international travel. 

Speaking at the World Travel and Tourism Councilin Mexico, he added: ‘Because of the progress in our vaccine rollout with 22 per cent of our population having had their first dose already, we expect by June to be at the green light.

‘We are having close conversations with UK authorities and we are exchanging information on Spain’s digital system and the trial happening at our airports in May.’ 

Meanwhile, it was revealed UK Transport Secretary Grant Shapps will hold talks with G7 counterparts at the Cornwall summit between June 11 and 13 with a view to securing a free travel agreement to popular destinations.

Mr Shapps will argue that they should agree international standards for vaccinated travellers heading to ‘green list’ nations who show digital proof of vaccination, a negative test or proof of immunity at passport control.

There would also be talks on bilateral ‘travel corridors’ to the US, France, Italy, Germany and other nations for passengers with a covid passport, according to the Daily Telegraph.

But Greece, which will open its borders on May 15 – two days before the UK allows holidays – is planning to go it alone, for now. 

ITALY: Britain is pushing for vaccinated Brits with Covid passports to be able to holiday freely by the end of June

ITALY: Britain is pushing for vaccinated Brits with Covid passports to be able to holiday freely by the end of June

GREECE: The islands including Rhodes (pictured) are ready to welcome tourists in mid-May and plan random testing at airports to deal with tourists

GREECE: The islands including Rhodes (pictured) are ready to welcome tourists in mid-May and plan random testing at airports to deal with tourists

 

Boris Johnson (pictured yesterday) has vowed to push on with vaccine passports despite increasing warnings they could discriminate

Greek Tourism Minister Harry Theoharis says his country will welcome vaccinated Britons without one

Boris Johnson (pictured yesterday) has vowed to push on with vaccine passports despite increasing warnings they could discriminate but Greek Tourism Minister Harry Theoharis says his country will welcome vaccinated Britons without one

Greece insists the paper handwritten NHS card handed out with a jab will suffice as proof until the EU catches up

Greece insists the paper handwritten NHS card handed out with a jab will suffice as proof until the EU catches up

Harry Theoharis, the Greek tourism minister, told The Times their resorts will be open to any vaccinated Britons as long as they present their NHS vaccination card, signed by a nurse of doctor after getting the jab.

He said ‘Until the UK has a digital passport, we have seen the paper cards that are provided with the two vaccine appointment dates and we are recognising them. They can be used on the ground and at the borders.’ 

Mr Theoharis said that testing would take place on arrivals, but only at random, with a review if positive cases jump upwards in the UK.

Turkey and Bulgaria lift travel bans for Britons and confirm tourists WON’T need a vaccine while bookings for villas in Greece and Portugal soar 

Turkey has announced that British tourists will be welcome in the country this summer without having to show a vaccination certificate.

Visitors from the UK will not need to produce a Covid vaccine passport, but will need to show proof of a negative PCR test.  

The country also promises to provide testing for tourists before they return to the UK, with tests at hotels or airports costing around £25. Until now PCR tests for a family of four can cost as much as £500.

Tui, the world’s largest tour operator, said it had seen a surge in bookings to popular Turkish coastal resorts even before today’s announcement.  

Rental company The Luxury Travel Book told MailOnline it had seen a spike in bookings for luxury villas in Greece, Portugal and Mallorca after the Greek Tourism Minister announced the plan to welcome British tourists from mid-May. 

People are booking up for month-long trips and asking for WiFi and a desk and are taking the whole family so that they can get paid to work from home while on holiday.

The firm has also seen double the amount of requests for Greek villas compared to previous years, with demand for fully serviced villas with a chef, butler and housekeeper so tourists can stay away from busy restaurants. 

Popular islands Mykonos, Santorini, Corfu and Crete are already getting booked up, with most bookings from 2020 rolled over into this year. 

Brits are also looking for properties on smaller islands including Hydra, Paxos and Syros, which are off the beaten track and away from the crowds.

He added that once the EU sets up a digital scheme then they will sign up, but they are not willing to wait.

The European Union will throw open its borders to America this summer as it uses ‘the same jabs’ as the bloc, its top Eurocrat said yesterday.

European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen said the EU was in advanced talks with Washington about kick-starting holidays by using ‘vaccine passports’ to re-open transatlantic routes.

But yesterday a Commission spokesman said there were ‘no such contacts yet’ between the UK and EU over recognition of health certificates for getting Britons back on European beaches.

In an interview with the New York Times Mrs von der Leyen said: ‘The Americans, as far as I can see, use European Medicines Agency-approved vaccines. This will enable free movement and the travel to the European Union.’

She added: ‘Because one thing is clear: All 27 member states will accept, unconditionally, all those who vaccinated with vaccines that are approved by the EMA.’

Lavishing further praise on the Biden administration she added that the US was ‘on track’ and making ‘huge progress’ with its campaign to reach so-called herd immunity, or the vaccination of 70 percent of adults, by mid-June.

America is currently rolling out the Moderna, Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson vaccine jabs, which are also approved for use across the EU by the European Medicines Agency.

Asked whether Mrs von der Leyen was in similar talks with the UK, a Commission spokesman said: ‘So far there are no contacts to this end with the UK.’

The majority of Britons want the UK’s foreign travel ban to last until next year – and most have no intention of going on holiday anywhere this summer, an exclusive poll for MailOnline revealed today, as Ministers rush through covid passports in time to start foreign breaks on May 17.

As Spain said it was ‘desperate’ for Brits to return this summer, some 55 per cent back extending the Covid restrictions on non-essential trips abroad into 2022 – while just 21 per cent would oppose the idea.

Meanwhile, 43 per cent say they are not planning to go anywhere at all on holiday this summer, with only a quarter harbouring hopes of a break in another country.

The findings, in an exclusive poll for MailOnline by Redfield & Wilton Strategies, underline the level of nervousness among the population after a year of brutal lockdowns.

It comes as ministers try to rush through ‘Covid passports’ in time for the scheduled easing of the non-essential travel ban on May 17 – but will only reveal the UK’s ‘green list’ of countries on May 7 – as Spain talked up a quarantine-free travel corridor.

Vaccine passports could create a 'two-tier society', but many voters back them for travel

Vaccine passports could create a ‘two-tier society’, but many voters back them for travel

Millions could go to pubs with no social distancing under plans to let drinkers use mobile phones to prove they are free of Covid. This graphic shows how the app would have worked

Millions could go to pubs with no social distancing under plans to let drinkers use mobile phones to prove they are free of Covid. This graphic shows how the app would have worked 

Greece says it is ready to welcome vaccinated British tourists immediately when its resorts open up on May 15, while Spain and Portugal say they will throw open their borders from June along with much of the EU.

Spanish Tourism Secretary, Fernando Valdés, said he wants UK holidaymakers to ‘restart holidays’ in six weeks, adding: ‘We are desperate to welcome you this summer. We’ve been having constant conversations with UK authorities’. Mr Valdes said a travel corridor between the two countries, allowing quarantine-free breaks, is firmly on the table but only with covid passports ‘easing’ the return of ‘safe’ travel.

The European Union’s ban on visitors in 2021 is not expected to apply to the UK because of its world-leading jab programme that has seen more than 33million get one dose and 10million of those receive both doses already.

‘Longest summer ever’ as Britons plan to take holidays throughout autumn to beat global Covid crackdowns

Britons are preparing for the ‘longest summer ever’ as lockdown-weary holidaymakers rush to go abroad as late as November to beat global Covid crackdowns.

Autumn bookings for international trips have seen an 80 per cent surge in interest compared to 2019 – as tour operators, hotels and airlines all report increased queries about later holidays.

It comes amid warnings that summer trips could be under threat if the Foreign Office advises against travel to green list countries.

The Government is preparing to lift the ban on international travel on May 17 and is finalising plans for a ‘traffic light’ system to determine which countries will be authorised destinations.

However, experts have warned of confusion because the Foreign Office is expected to publish its own advice which could differ from the colour-coded scheme.

 

A Government source told MailOnline that the Covid passport scheme would be in place next month to help people who want to travel to countries that are requiring proof of vaccination – but the source insisted that the key factor for Britons will be the rules on quarantine when returning to the UK.

‘You’ve got countries saying we will welcome you. But it depends what the precautions on return are. We will have that green, amber, red system. It is about what you face when you come back to the UK…. Can you isolate for 10 days?’, the insider said.

And they suggested that holidaymakers will not know what countries fall into what ‘traffic light’ category until around a week before May 17, probably May 7. The criteria for assessing countries are set to include whether there are variants of concern, how good their genomic scanning system is, vaccination levels, and overall infection levels.

‘That will all become clear much nearer the time,’ one source said. ‘India has just gone off… You’re going to book a holiday in Spain in June? Well, good luck, but just make sure you are insured.’

Britons are preparing for the ‘longest summer ever’ as lockdown-weary holidaymakers rush to go abroad as late as November to beat global Covid crackdowns.

Autumn bookings for international trips have seen an 80 per cent surge in interest compared to 2019 – as tour operators, hotels and airlines all report increased queries about later holidays.

It comes amid warnings that summer trips could be under threat if the Foreign Office advises against travel to green list countries.

The Government is preparing to lift the ban on international travel on May 17 and is finalising plans for a ‘traffic light’ system to determine which countries will be authorised destinations.

However, experts have warned of confusion because the Foreign Office is expected to publish its own advice which could differ from the colour-coded scheme.

This means if the FO advises against travel to a certain country – even if it is permitted by the traffic light system – holidaymakers could see their plans disrupted.

Most holiday companies will not operate services in countries the Foreign Office has advised against visiting.

Meanwhile, going to a country against government guidelines will invalidate travel insurance.

Britons keen to avoid potential holiday issues – and those concerned about a much-slower vaccine rollout in several European nations – are looking at going abroad much later in the year.

Online flight booking website Skyscanner told The Times that more sunseekers are looking at holidays in September, October and November now than they were in 2019.

Some 43 per cent of all bookings at Co-op Travel fell into the late-summer category.

It was earlier revealed that even destinations on the green or amber list – where travel is permitted – could be off-limits if the Foreign Office advises against travelling to them.

Their advice is based on factors such as the risk of individuals getting stuck by Covid restrictions or the capacity and quality of the country’s health services.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk