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American expat shares the ‘bizarre’ words she learned from her Australian boyfriend

American expat shares the ‘bizarre’ words she learned from her Australian boyfriend that she’s NEVER heard – and what she uses instead

  • Sophia is an American expat who moved to Sydney two years ago
  • She started dating an Australian man from Adelaide who shared his lingo
  • ‘I learned that when I say spatula I actually want what he calls an “egg flipper” 
  • Final turn of phrase he said differently was ‘powerpoint’, where she uses outlet

An American expat has spoken about the words she has noticed are said completely differently by her Australian boyfriend.

Sophia, who goes by @sophiainsydney now that she has left her native Los Angeles, shared a video on TikTok talking about the three words her partner taught her that differ from her home country.

‘I learned that when I say spatula I actually want what he calls an “egg flipper”. He also text me saying RON which meant “later on,”‘ she explained.

The final turn of phrase he said differently was ‘power point’, a word she replaces with ‘outlet’ in the US. 

Sophia, who goes by @sophiainsydney now that she has left Los Angeles , shared a video on TikTok talking about the three words he taught her that differ from her home country

Common words Australians and Americans say differently: A GUIDE 

AUSTRALIA

Egg flipper

Powerpoint

Ron 

Footpath 

Petrol station

Garbage bin 

Autumn 

Biro 

Blackboard 

Bushfire 

Curtains 

Diary 

Dobber

AMERICA

Spatula

Outlet 

Later on 

Sidewalk

Gas station 

Trash can 

Fall 

Ballpoint 

Chalkboard 

Wildfire 

Drapes 

Journal 

Snitch 

But not all of her fans were convinced that ‘RON’ was used Down Under, with many saying they’d never heard it before.

Previously Sophia shared the ‘slang phrases’ she refuses to use despite living in Sydney for the past two years because they differ from the phases she’s used to.

‘I don’t use foyer for a lobby. For car park I still say parking or parking lot. Tea towels are just towels. Petrol is gas and everything is a tissue out here, when I say napkin,’ she explained.

Plenty of her Australian followers were confused by the wording, saying they also use the word lobby and napkin.

Previously Sophia shared the 'slang phrases' she refuses to use despite living in Sydney for the past two years because they differ from the phases she's used to

Previously Sophia shared the ‘slang phrases’ she refuses to use despite living in Sydney for the past two years because they differ from the phases she’s used to

‘Literally the whole world apart from North Americans use the word petrol instead of gas,’ one fan said.

‘It’s amazing how varied the English language is in the US, England and Australia,’ said another.    

Last month Sophia was forced to defend her Bunnings sausage sizzle-eating style after she paired two slices of bread with the iconic meat and onion combination.  

She had been asked by her Australian followers to give the hardware store’s lunchtime delicacy a try.

‘Alright, you guys have been telling me to get a sausage sizzle for the past few years,’ she said.

Sophia, who goes by @sophiainsydney now that she has left Los Angeles, had been asked by her Australian followers to give the hardware store's lunchtime delicacy a try

Sophia, who goes by @sophiainsydney now that she has left Los Angeles, had been asked by her Australian followers to give the hardware store’s lunchtime delicacy a try

‘So this is my first sausage sizzle. Honestly, the Costco hot dog is so much better than this – but whatever, I gave it a try.

‘And the proceeds go to charity so it’s for a good cause.’

More alarming than her sub par review of the experience was that she had been given two slices of bread for each sizzle – a crime dubbed ‘unAustralian’ by her fans.

‘Who set up this poor tourist to look so silly? One piece of bread folded and triangle!’ one person responded.  

‘I’m telling my therapist about what you just did,’ said another. 

A third added: ‘The D I S R E S P E C T. Instant deportation, no remorse,’ said one.  

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk