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Anna Faris and her family are ‘lucky to be alive’ following carbon monoxide poisoning scare


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Scary Movie actress Anna Faris was given a real life scare on Thanksgiving Day that left her and her family feeling ‘very fortunate’ to be alive

Scary Movie actress Anna Faris was given a real life scare on Thanksgiving Day that left her and her family feeling ‘very fortunate’ to be alive.

In a tweet last week, the actress, whose family had rented out a house in North Lake Tahoe for the holiday season, revealed that she and 12 of her family members were saved by first responders after falling ill to carbon monoxide poisoning.

‘I’m not quite sure how to express gratitude to the north Lake Tahoe fire department- we were saved from carbon monoxide- it’s a stupidly dramatic story but I’m feeling very fortunate,’ Faris tweeted in the aftermath.

On Tuesday, the North Tahoe Tahoe Fire Protection District echoed that the 43-year-old and her large extended family were ‘lucky to be alive’.

The District said all of the family members fell ill to ‘varying degrees’ shortly after arriving at the rental home, however the group believed the symptoms were coming as a result of altitude sickness.

As their conditions continued to worsen after sitting down for Thanksgiving lunch, two of the family members went to a local hospital to be checked out – which would prove to be a life-saving decision.

In a tweet last week, the actress, whose family had rented out a house in North Lake Tahoe for the holiday season, revealed that she and 12 of her family members were saved by first responders after falling ill to carbon monoxide poisoning

In a tweet last week, the actress, whose family had rented out a house in North Lake Tahoe for the holiday season, revealed that she and 12 of her family members were saved by first responders after falling ill to carbon monoxide poisoning

The family members fell ill to ‘varying degrees’ shortly after arriving at the rental home (above), however the group believed the symptoms were coming as a result of altitude sickness

Immediately, hospital staff identified signs of carbon monoxide poisoning and alerted the North Tahoe Fire Protection District, who raced to save the remaining 11 ill family members – who ranged from three to 70 years old – still inside the rental home.

Two more of the patients were taken to hospital for further treatment and the remaining nine were treated at the scene.

The Fire Protection District said the home had an indoor carbon monoxide level of 55 parts per million, even with windows and doors open for ventilation. The maximum recommended indoor level of carbon monoxide is 9 parts per million. 

The home was immediately aired out. There were no carbon monoxide alarms inside the home, authorities said.

‘They ran the furnace to do some testing and the levels in the basement were at 446 parts per million,’ North Tahoe Fire Protection District spokeswoman Erin Holland told FOX40. ‘And so that is certainly something that is going to cause fatality in a short period of time.’ 

Five days on from the ordeal, and the front door of the home remains open to aid ventilation efforts. 

‘I’m not quite sure how to express gratitude to the north Lake Tahoe fire department- we were saved from carbon monoxide- it’s a stupidly dramatic story but I’m feeling very fortunate,’ Faris tweeted in the aftermat

‘I’m not quite sure how to express gratitude to the north Lake Tahoe fire department- we were saved from carbon monoxide- it’s a stupidly dramatic story but I’m feeling very fortunate,’ Faris tweeted in the aftermat

Faris tweeted a number of updates from the rental home in the lead-up to Thanksgiving dinner, including this photo of her dad and brother, however none of the messages referenced her relatives falling ill

Faris tweeted a number of updates from the rental home in the lead-up to Thanksgiving dinner, including this photo of her dad and brother, however none of the messages referenced her relatives falling ill

Five days on from the ordeal, and the front door of the home remains open to aid ventilation efforts

‘We are so thankful to report that this holiday disaster was averted,’ Fire Chief Mike Schwartz said.

‘Situational awareness is so important. Whether you are at home or traveling, it is important ensure that smoke and CO alarms are in working order anywhere you stay. It’s not a bad idea to consider bringing your own alarm when you travel, just to be safe.’

Faris tweeted a number of amusing updates from the rental home in the lead-up to Thanksgiving dinner, however none of the messages referenced her relatives falling ill.

Carbon monoxide is often referred to as the silent killer, the fire department said, as it’s undetectable because it’s odorless and invisible.

The toxic gas kills by depriving the bloodstream of any oxygen, which essentially slowly suffocates its victims.

Symptoms include headache, dizziness, disorientation, nausea, and difficulty coordinating or breathing.

‘So thankful for a happy ending to this carbon monoxide,’ North Tahoe Fire tweeted in response to Faris’ tweet Tuesday. ‘Never assume you’re safe, check your alarms whenever you travel.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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