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Arrested Huawei CFO’s lawyers argue that the charges against her are not a crime in Canada

Arrested Huawei CFO’s lawyers argue that the charges against her are not a crime in Canada and try to block her extradition to the US

  • Meng Wanzhou, 47, appeared at extradition hearing on Tuesday in Vancouver
  • She is charged in the US with violating American sanctions against Iran
  • Her lawyers argue that Canada has no such sanctions and should release her
  • Meng is currently free on bond and arguments in the case continue this week 

Lawyers for a senior executive of Chinese tech giant Huawei have argued that allowing her extradition to the United States would result in Canada bowing to foreign law.

Meng Wanzhou, 47, appeared at the hearing in Vancouver on Tuesday wearing the GPS ankle monitor she has been fitted with while free on bond pending extradition to the U.S. 

This week’s hearings deal with the question of whether the U.S. charges against Meng are crimes in Canada as well. Her lawyers argue the case is really about U.S. sanctions against Iran, not a fraud case. Canada does not have similar sanctions on Iran.

‘Canada doesn’t enforce foreign criminal law,’ said Meng’s lawyer, Eric Gottardi. ‘We simply cannot import that law and have it operate in Canada domestically. It´s contrary to our values.’

Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou leaves her home to attend a hearing in British Columbia Supreme Court on Tuesday in Vancouver, British Columbia

Meng, who is out on bail and remains under partial house arrest after she was detained last year at the behest of American authorities, leaves B.C. Supreme Court, in Vancouver

Meng, who is out on bail and remains under partial house arrest after she was detained last year at the behest of American authorities, leaves B.C. Supreme Court, in Vancouver

Meng Wanzhou chief financial officer of Huawei wears an ankle monitor as she leaves her home to go to B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, Tuesday

Meng Wanzhou chief financial officer of Huawei wears an ankle monitor as she leaves her home to go to B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, Tuesday

Canada’s arrest of Huawei’s chief financial officer, the daughter of the company’s founder, in late 2018 infuriated Beijing to the point it detained two Canadians in apparent retaliation.

The U.S. accuses Huawei of using a Hong Kong shell company to sell equipment to Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions. It says Meng, 47, committed fraud by misleading the HSBC bank about the company’s business dealings in Iran.

Meng, who is free on bail and living in one of the two Vancouver mansions she owns, sat next to the court interpreter. She listened the proceedings with her head down studying documents.

Meng denies the U.S. allegations. Her defense team says comments by President Donald Trump suggest the case against her is politically motivated.

Prosecutors say that Meng’s case is separate from the wider China-U.S. trade dispute, but Trump undercut that message weeks after her arrest when he said he would consider intervening in the case if it would help forge a trade deal with Beijing.

This courtroom shows Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou seen attending her extradition hearing in British Columbia Supreme Court in Vancouver, British Columbia

This courtroom shows Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou seen attending her extradition hearing in British Columbia Supreme Court in Vancouver, British Columbia

Meng leaves court on Tuesday. Canada's arrest of Huawei's chief financial officer, the daughter of the company's founder, in late 2018 infuriated Beijing

Meng leaves court on Tuesday. Canada’s arrest of Huawei’s chief financial officer, the daughter of the company’s founder, in late 2018 infuriated Beijing

In apparent retaliation for Meng's arrest, China detained former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig and Canadian entrepreneur Michael Spavor

In apparent retaliation for Meng’s arrest, China detained former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig and Canadian entrepreneur Michael Spavor

Huawei represents China’s progress in becoming a technological power and has been a subject of U.S. security concerns for years. Beijing views Meng’s case as an attempt to contain China’s rise.

Huawei is the biggest global supplier of network gear for cellphone and internet companies. Washington is pressuring other countries to limit use of its technology, warning they could be opening themselves up to surveillance and theft.

Arguments will continue throughout the week.

The second phase, scheduled for June, will consider defense allegations that Canada Border Services, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the FBI violated Meng’s rights while collecting evidence before she was actually arrested.

In apparent retaliation for Meng’s arrest, China detained former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig and Canadian entrepreneur Michael Spavor. The two men have been denied access to lawyers and family and are being held in prison cells where the lights are kept on 24-hours-a-day.

China has also placed restrictions on various Canadian exports to China, including canola oil seed and meat. Last January, China also handed a death sentence to a convicted Canadian drug smuggler in a sudden retrial. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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