Atlassian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes plan to build worlds largest solar farm in Australia

Billionaire Aussie tech kingpin’s radical plan to build world’s largest solar farm in the Outback and sell energy to Asia – creating 2,000 jobs and $2billion in exports a year

  • Atlassian co-founder’s backs ‘Sun Cable’, word’s first intercontinental power grid
  • Mike Cannon-Brookes plans to build world’s largest solar farm in Aussie outback
  • Solar grid in the Northern Territory would supply 15% of Singapore’s electricity
  • $30b plan would see 2,000 jobs created and $2b in Australian exports per year

A tech billionaire is helping build one of the world’s largest solar farms in the Australian outback that could see the country make billions in cheap energy exports.

Atlassian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes’ is helping develop the world’s first intercontinental power grid connecting Australia to Singapore to supply round-the-clock renewable electricity. 

The ‘Sun Cable’ will see 125sqm of solar panels in the Northern Territory, a battery 150 times larger than the biggest in the country and a 5,000km ‘extension cord’. 

Mr Cannon-Brookes is one of several investors in the project that will create a new green energy export industry and reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. 

Atlassian co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes (pictured) wants to build the world’s largest solar farm in the Australian outback that would supply Singapore with 15% of its electricity needs

‘Think about it as a giant extension cable that runs from our sunny deserts up to Asia,’ Mr Cannon-Brookes told The Daily Telegraph.

‘There are two or three billion consumers that want cheap energy and want a lot of that energy and we have it and can provide it.’ 

The $30billion project is part of Mr Cannon-Brookes’ plan to power Asia using the Australian sun, supplying 15 per cent of Singapore’s electricity needs and generating up to $2billion a year in exports. 

The $30billion Sun Cable project (pictured) would involved 125sqm of solar panels built in the Northern Territory

The $30billion Sun Cable project (pictured) would involved 125sqm of solar panels built in the Northern Territory

Power lines will stretch from the NT to Darwin including 4,200km of underwater cables that would run from Indonesia to Singapore, making it the world’s largest renewable energy transmission network. 

The project will also include the world’s largest battery, capable of storing between 36 to 42 gigawatt hours – Australia’s current ‘big battery’ is only 129 megawatt hours.

Construction is set to begin in 2024, as a result approximately 2,000 jobs are expected to be created during development with completion estimated by 2028.

As well as providing cheap energy to the Asian market the bold plan could also see electricity prices for Australian customers fall, starting with cheaper rates in the NT.

Currently 77.4 per cent of Australia’s electricity is generated from the fossil fuels coal, gas and oil while 22.6 per cent comes from renewables such as solar, wind and hydro.

Net-zero sceptics say moving too fast towards renewable energy would leave the nation short on power and see electricity prices skyrocket. 

But Mr Cannon-Brookes believes Australia has all the natural resources needed to become the next energy super power. 

By unlocking the vast, solar and land resources that Australia has available, Sun Cable could be creating the pathway for a new export industry. 

‘Australia should have the cheapest power on the planet,’ Mr Cannon-Brookes told the news outlet.

‘We have so many resources opportunities in our sun and wind. We are the lucky country in terms of where we sit geographically in the world and our natural resources when it comes to renewables,’ he added.

Power lines would stretch from the NT to Darwin including 4,200km of underwater cables that would run from Indonesia to Singapore (pictured, stock photo)

Power lines would stretch from the NT to Darwin including 4,200km of underwater cables that would run from Indonesia to Singapore (pictured, stock photo)

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk