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Aussies smokes will be paying up to $48.50 for a pack this year

Smokers be warned: How cigarette prices will soar a staggering 12.5% before the end of this year – and a pack of Marlboro Golds will cost you almost $50

  • The cost of a packet of cigarettes will spike another 12.5 per cent in September  
  • The hike will see a 25 pack of Marlboro Golds cost an eye-watering $48.50 
  • Even people who roll their own cigarettes are not immune from the tax hike  
  • Despite massive price hikes smoking rates in adults have stalled, statistics say 

The price of Australian cigarettes are set to rise again this year by another 12.5 per cent – taking the average packet to almost $50. 

From September, Australians will be paying one of the highest prices in the world for a packet of cigarettes, with a 25 pack of Marlboro Golds costing an eye-watering $48.50.

The cheapest pack will be about $29.

The price hike will be the eighth consecutive yearly increase, and is part of the government’s attempt to reduce tobacco use.  

However, experts claim the soaring prices punishes those who are addicted and further stimulates the black market.

Up and up and up and up: The federal government’s tobacco excise has leaped 12.5 per cent for every year since 2013 – plus an additional 25 per cent increase in 2010

People looking to save a buck by rolling their own sticks are not immune to the tax sting, with prices for a bag of tobacco jumping by a similar amount. 

A pack-a-day smoker will now likely spend over $10,000 a year on their habit.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) found price hikes were ‘the single most effective way to encourage tobacco users to quit and prevent children from starting to smoke’. 

However, Dr Colin Mendelsohn, from the University of NSW’s school of public health, previously told Daily Mail Australia the tax hikes were no longer having the big impact on smoking rates they once did.  

Colin Mendelsohn said the tax hikes are no longer having a big impact on smoking rates

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), price hikes were ‘the single most effective way to encourage tobacco users to quit and prevent children from starting to smoke’. 

But data released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics showed the number of adults who smoke daily has been stagnant in recent years – dropping only 0.7 per cent between 2014-15 and 2017-18.

Figures had plunged from 23.8 per cent in 1995 to 13.8 per cent in 2017-18. 

Dr Mendelsohn said: ‘We’ve traditionally always known increasing taxes reduces smoking once.

‘But once you get to this eyewatering level people who are addicted will say, ‘I have no choice I have to keep smoking anyway.

‘You just don’t get the benefit anymore. All you’re doing is punishing the addicted smokers who can’t quit and stimulating the black market.’

Despite plain packaging, gruesome advertisements and ever more expensive cigarettes, Australian smoking rates have stalled

Despite plain packaging, gruesome advertisements and ever more expensive cigarettes, Australian smoking rates have stalled

Last year there was an increase in the amount of tobacco being sold on the black market. 

More than 300 tonnes of smuggled contraband was seized by officials, WA Today reported.

WA Border Force commander Rod O’Donnell said there was a lot of money to be made in the illegal trade. 

While admitting the cost of cigarettes was contributing to the explosion in the industry, he supported the high excise.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison himself announced the regular tax hit when he was the treasurer in 2016. 

Handing down the 2016-17 budget, Mr Morrison said the excise hikes would net the government $4.7 billion over four years. 

TOBACCO EXCISE HIKES OVER THE YEARS 
Year   Increase 
April 2010 25 per cent (one off)
December  2013  12.5 per cent 
September 2014 12.5 per cent 
September 2015 12.5 per cent 
September 2016 12.5 per cent 
September 2017 12.5 per cent 
September 2018 12.5 per cent 
September 2019 12.5 per cent 
September 2020 12.5 per cent 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk