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Australian academic says proud parents could be breaching their kids’ human rights

Academic claims parents could be breaching their kids’ human rights and leaving them vulnerable to sex offenders by sharing photos of them on social media

  • Cassandra Seery claimed posting information about kids violates their rights
  • Parents who share kids photos could also leave them open to sexual exploitation
  • Ms Seery, from Deakin University, said job future prospects could be effected

Parents who share photos of their kids online could be violating their basic human rights, harming future job prospects, and leaving them venerable to sexual exploitation, an academic has claimed.

Associate Lecturer Cassandra Seery, from Deakin Law School in Melbourne, made a submission to the United Nations claiming that posting information about children infringes the rights dictated in the Convention on the Rights of the Child.

‘These potential impacts could extend beyond childhood, leading to lifelong inequalities,’ Ms Seery said.

She said parents are entrusted with their child’s personal information, but the current state of digital media means the release of that information is unregulated, and can lead to sexual exploitation

‘The truth is we don’t really know how this data might be used in the future and how it may impact on a child’s rights.’

‘For example, it has become increasingly common practice for prospective employers to conduct social media screenings – these processes could also be applied to children in a range of circumstances. 

‘Private education institutions may choose to screen parents’ profiles to determine the suitability of prospective students, which may impact on rights relating to non-discrimination and access to education.’

The associate lecturer also explained businesses can gain access to lifelong digital records, potentially effecting the child’s ability to access social security and justice services, healthcare, and affordable insurance.

Associate Lecturer Cassandra Seery (pictured), made a submission to the United Nations claiming that posting information about children infringes their rights

Associate Lecturer Cassandra Seery (pictured), made a submission to the United Nations claiming that posting information about children infringes their rights

She said parents are entrusted with their child’s personal information, but the current state of digital media means the release of that information is unregulated, and can lead to sexual exploitation. 

‘This behaviour is not illegal and children have no rights to prevent it,’ Ms Seery said.

‘Children should have the right to choose when they enter the digital environment.’ 

She suggested social media outlets introduce prompts prior to posting photos or videos of children online and restricting the sharing of content that includes a child’s information.

Ms Seery also removing the ability to tag kids in photos and changing the Privacy Act would be good places to start. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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