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Australian fitness star Sophie Guidolin ‘didn’t cry for SIX YEARS’ over shame of being ‘sensitive’

Australian fitness star Sophie Guidolin has claimed she ‘didn’t cry for six years’ because she was ashamed of being too sensitive.

The Gold Coast nutritionist, 32, said she once felt a ‘lot of shame’ about her emotions but has learned to embrace them, and now allows both positive and negative sensations to be ‘fully felt’.

The mother-of-four shared proof of her newfound emotional connection in an Instagram reel which shows her in floods of tears at home and in her car.

‘As an embodied feminine creature, my emotions are now fully felt, especially during a full moon. Are you a sensitive soul? Is it a blessing or a curse?’ she wrote in the caption.

Australian fitness star Sophie Guidolin (pictured) has claimed she ‘didn’t cry for six years’ because she was ashamed of being too sensitive

Open the flood gates: The Gold Coast nutritionist (pictured) said while she once felt a 'lot of shame' about her emotions, she has learned to embrace them

The mother-of-four shared proof of her newfound emotional connection in an Instagram reel which shows her in floods of tears at home and in her car

Open the flood gates: The Gold Coast nutritionist (pictured) said while she once felt a ‘lot of shame’ about her emotions, she has learned to embrace them

The revelations, which have been viewed 90,400 times since they were uploaded online on Thursday, sparked a storm of support with fans rallying behind the blogger, saying they ‘relate so much’.

‘I am super sensitive. I believe it’s a blessing in terms of I am incredibly empathetic and compassionate but at the same time I hate how emotionally invested I get into everything,’ one woman replied.

She added: ‘Sometimes I feel like my heart doesn’t get a break.’

‘I can relate to this so much,’ said a second, while a third added: ‘Love me a good cry.’ 

At first glance, Guidolin appears to be living a charmed existence, with four adorable kids, a killer physique and multiple business ventures including a popular online nutrition programme, a podcast, and a partnership with Reebok. 

But it hasn’t always been easy.

The mother-of-four (pictured) said she now allows both positive and negative emotions to be 'fully felt'

The mother-of-four (pictured) said she now allows both positive and negative emotions to be ‘fully felt’

Guidolin (pictured) said she once felt a 'lot of shame' about her emotional side

Guidolin (pictured) said she once felt a ‘lot of shame’ about her emotional side

The bodybuilding champion was inspired to study nutrition after welcoming her first child at 19 and developing ‘GD’, a form of high blood sugar that affects pregnant women and increases their risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

One year later, she gave birth to her second son and gained ‘about 28kg’ which left her struggling to complete even the most basic of tasks.

Determined to change her lifestyle, the teen mum started by walking with her pram and quickly became addicted to the feel-good rush exercise gave her.

In the 12 years since, she has channelled her passion for fitness into writing nine books, winning multiple world rankings in bodybuilding, recording her own podcast, Flourished and Fulfilled, and launching a luxury journal brand of the same name.

All while raising her two sons, aged 14 and 13, plus adorable five-year-old twin girls.

The former bodybuilding champion (pictured) was inspired to study nutrition after welcoming her first child at 19 and developing gestation diabetes

In the 12 years since, Sophie (pictured) has channelled her passion for fitness into writing nine books, recording her own podcast, Flourished and Fulfilled, and launching a luxury journal brand of the same name

The former bodybuilding champion (pictured) was inspired to study nutrition after welcoming her first child at 19 and developing gestation diabetes

Guidolin (pictured) is also mother to two sons, aged 14 and 13, plus adorable five-year-old twin girls

Guidolin (pictured) is also mother to two sons, aged 14 and 13, plus adorable five-year-old twin girls

Guidolin began her remarkable rise to fame by sharing her fitness journey on social media, and soon realised the potential of the then relatively untapped online nutrition industry.

‘I was getting so many messages –  I couldn’t keep up with them –  from women asking for tips and recipe ideas and that’s how it all started. I put together my first e-book and it just blew up from there,’ she told news.com.au.

The self-made businesswoman has attracted a loyal audience of 531,000 Instagram followers who look to her for tips on achieving their dream physique.

But while you might assume Guidolin’s rippling abs and peachy glutes are the result of an unattainably gruelling routine, she insists this is not the case.

‘Looking after yourself doesn’t have to take hours. In fact, most weeks I train for 45 minutes three to five times per week,’ she said.

The self-made businesswoman (pictured) has attracted a loyal audience of 531,000 Instagram followers who look to her for tips on achieving their dream physique

The self-made businesswoman (pictured) has attracted a loyal audience of 531,000 Instagram followers who look to her for tips on achieving their dream physique

Ms Guidolin revealed the secret to her shredded abs is simple: ‘consistency’.

‘I have a philosophy that if you can’t maintain something, don’t start it or it is simply a fad diet and not sustainable,’ she said.

‘It’s integral that you enjoy what you’re doing too. If you hate running, don’t run. There are so many ways of moving.’

Earlier this month, the influencer made headlines for all the wrong reasons when she was accused of cultural appropriation after asking her followers if she should dress up as Pocahontas or Princess Jasmine for a Halloween party.

After posting a poll on Instagram Stories to let fans help her decide, she faced criticism because she is white and Pocahontas and Princess Jasmine are both women of colour.

Guidolin, 32, posted this poll on Instagram so fans could help her decide, but she faced criticism because she is white and Pocahontas and Princess Jasmine are both women of colour

Guidolin, 32, posted this poll on Instagram so fans could help her decide, but she faced criticism because she is white and Pocahontas and Princess Jasmine are both women of colour

Over Influencers, an Instagram account that documents social media gaffes, reposted Guidolin's poll, leading critics to accuse her of cultural insensitivity

Over Influencers, an Instagram account that documents social media gaffes, reposted Guidolin’s poll, leading critics to accuse her of cultural insensitivity

A poll on her Instagram story asking fans to help her decide was met with fierce criticism because she is white, while Pocahontas and Princess Jasmine are both women of colour.

Pocahontas was a Native American woman from the 17th century whose life story was fictionalised in the 1995 Disney film of the same name. 

Princess Jasmine is a fictional Arabian character from the 1992 Disney animation, Aladdin.

Over Influencers, an Instagram account that documents social media gaffes, reposted Guidolin’s poll, leading critics to accuse her of cultural insensitivity.

Princess Jasmine is a fictional Arabian character from the 1992 Disney animation Aladdin

Pocahontas was a Native American woman from the 17th century whose life story was fictionalised in the 1995 Disney film of the same name

Storyline: Pocahontas (right) was a Native American woman from the 17th century whose life story was fictionalised in the 1995 Disney film of the same name. Princess Jasmine (left) is a fictional Arabian character from the 1992 Disney animation Aladdin

‘It’s 2021. People have been pulled up for this before. What planet are you living on to think this is still okay? Let me guess, they’re white girls making a way as influencers living on the Gold Coast,’ one person wrote.

‘The two princesses you just shouldn’t dress up as,’ said another.

A third added: ‘Why not just go ‘black-face’? Would be same-same. #fail.’

One critic pointed out: ‘Pocahontas was based on a 12-year-old native girl who was kidnapped and raped and died in London when early settlers stole her from her land.’

Guidolin deleted her social media poll following the backlash.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk