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Australian media personality Deborah Hutton talks about having two skin cancers recently removed

She underwent surgery to remove two skin cancers from her face in May, and now Deborah Hutton has spoken about her terrifying experience.

In an interview with A Current Affair on Monday, the 58-year-old Australian media personality admitted she was ‘shocked’ by the devastating diagnosis.

Deborah said she had had a basal cell carcinoma removed from the exact same spot on her face nine years earlier, and was stunned to discover it had returned. 

Speaking out: She underwent surgery to remove two skin cancers from her face in May, and now Deborah Hutton has spoken about her terrifying experience on A Current Affair on Monday

‘This is cancer. It’s cancer. I was just in shock, and I remember being told about it and I kind of just burst into tears,’ she recounted.

Calling it a ‘deeper and bigger operation’ than the one she required the first time around, Deborah said she ‘didn’t expect it’. 

She admitted she was worried it would leave her face irrevocably scarred after having carved out a successful career as a model.

Terrifying: Deborah shared a photo of her scarring shortly after her surgery to remove the cancer, and admitted she hesitated in sharing it, calling it 'confronting'

Terrifying: Deborah shared a photo of her scarring shortly after her surgery to remove the cancer, and admitted she hesitated in sharing it, calling it ‘confronting’

‘I was hesitant because it was bigger, and I was scared, too,’ she confessed. 

‘I sat there going, “Am I going to lose a lip?”, “Do I lose half my nose?” This is my face, this is my business, and so it’s very confronting. It’s very confronting.’

Deborah said she even started considering a career change, fearing she would lose ‘half my face’.

Battle wound: She said she's 'not self-conscious' about the scarring, knowing the skin cancer could have killed her

Battle wound: She said she’s ‘not self-conscious’ about the scarring, knowing the skin cancer could have killed her

When the stitches came out, Deborah said she ‘cried’ from both the pain and after seeing how much of her face they’d had to cut out. 

But she said she’s ‘not self-conscious’ about the scarring, knowing the skin cancer could have killed her. 

Given how aggressive the cancer was, Deborah acknowledged that she was extremely lucky to have caught it when she did.

'I had a mate come to pick me up from surgery and they said, "Don't go and buy a lottery ticket today, she's already won the lottery,"' she recounted

‘I had a mate come to pick me up from surgery and they said, “Don’t go and buy a lottery ticket today, she’s already won the lottery,”‘ she recounted

‘I had a mate come to pick me up from surgery and they said, “Don’t go and buy a lottery ticket today, she’s already won the lottery,”‘ she recounted.

She added: ‘It was like, “OK, we’ve got it just in time.”‘

Deborah shared a photo of her scarring shortly after her surgery to remove the cancer, and admitted she hesitated in sharing it, calling it ‘confronting’.

Devastating diagnosis: Deborah said she had had a basal cell carcinoma removed from the exact same spot on her face nine years earlier, and was stunned to discover it had returned

Devastating diagnosis: Deborah said she had had a basal cell carcinoma removed from the exact same spot on her face nine years earlier, and was stunned to discover it had returned

She said she only shared the photo to serve as something of a wake up call to people who may have been putting off getting their own skin checked. 

Like Deborah, Beard Season founder Jimmy Niggles is also urging people to get their skin checked. 

He explained he decided to grow a long beard after his friend Wes Bonny died from skin cancer in March 2010.

Raising awareness: Like Deborah, Beard Season founder Jimmy Niggles is also urging people to get their skin checked

Raising awareness: Like Deborah, Beard Season founder Jimmy Niggles is also urging people to get their skin checked

Jimmy said whenever anyone stops him to ask about his beard, he uses it as an opportunity to remind them to get their skin checked.  

‘Australia has the highest rate of melanoma. This is where it happens in this country,’ added Deborah.

‘So if you’re gonna play the dice, don’t play the dice game. If you see something, don’t put your head in the sand. Just deal with it.’ 

'I sat there going, "Am I going to lose a lip?", "Do I lose half my nose?" This is my face, this is my business, and so it's very confronting. It's very confronting,' she confessed

‘I sat there going, “Am I going to lose a lip?”, “Do I lose half my nose?” This is my face, this is my business, and so it’s very confronting. It’s very confronting,’ she confessed

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk