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Australian soldier who fought in Afghanistan reveals reason Taliban were always taking back country

An Australian soldier who fought in Afghanistan has described the Taliban as blank-eyed, emotionless robots ‘hypnotised’ to kill – and says that’s the reason they have been able to take over the country.

The ADF fighter, known only as John, told Triple M he spent nine months deployed in the war-torn country fighting the organisation after Australia joined America’s war on terror in the years following the September 11 attacks.

John said he was angry watching the Taliban ‘parading around like they’ve won’ and described the group as remorseless killers.  

‘When you come face to face with them it’s just blank. Their eyes are blank. There is no emotion there, no humanity,’ he said.

‘There’s no compassion, no humanity, no nothing. It’s like they’ve been hypnotised, it’s like they’re robots who have been programmed with what to do.’

An Australian soldier who fought in Afghanistan has described the Taliban as blank-eyed, emotionless robots – and says that’s the reason they have been able to take over the country

John said he’s spoken to his friends, both current and former soldiers, who agree the mission was a success despite the speed in which the Taliban reclaimed the country.

‘People are asking if it was worth it,’ he said.

‘We have to believe it was, how else do we look at the families of the boys we lost over there?’

The soldier said he is deeply concerned for the residents of Afghanistan and the people who worked alongside the ADF.

He said he particularly fears for interpreters, having seen the family of a man working alongside the Australian army brutally murdered as a result. 

‘I’m absolutely worried. I worked with guys who fought the Russians, grandfathers who fought the British. That’s all they’ve ever known,’ John said.

‘We had an interpreter working with us. When the Taliban found out he was working with us they beheaded his brother as a warning.

‘Couldn’t find him but could find his family so they beheaded his brother. But he kept working and supporting us.’

John said he's spoken to his friends, both current and former soldiers, who agree the mission was a success despite the speed in which the Taliban reclaimed the country

John said he’s spoken to his friends, both current and former soldiers, who agree the mission was a success despite the speed in which the Taliban reclaimed the country

A desperate father who worked as a security guard at the Australian embassy in Kabul (pictured) is hiding inside his house with his family in fear of being executed by the Taliban

A desperate father who worked as a security guard at the Australian embassy in Kabul (pictured) is hiding inside his house with his family in fear of being executed by the Taliban

He said Australia and its allies were right to hold back the Taliban for two decades because if they hadn’t, the fight could have been closer to home.  

‘We knew if we weren’t willing to fight them there then we would have to be willing to fight them here [at home],’ the digger told Triple M.

The Australian Defence Force lost 41 troops over the 20 years it was stationed in Afghanistan, but John said he ‘guarantees the boys would be ready to do it again’.   

‘There is an anger seeing them parading around but we have to believe it was worth it. No soldier ever died in vain,’ he said.

Australia will offer safe passage for 3,000 fleeing Afghanis as part of its humanitarian visa program.

They will prioritise people who have worked alongside Australian representatives, as well as people with family already in the country and persecuted minorities including the Persian-speaking Hazaras people.  

Ismail says he won't answer knocks at his door after locals told him the Taliban are urging residents to dob in anyone who worked for foreign countries

Ismail says he won’t answer knocks at his door after locals told him the Taliban are urging residents to dob in anyone who worked for foreign countries

A desperate father who claims to have worked as a security guard at the Australian embassy in Kabul is hiding inside his house with his family in fear of being executed by the Taliban.

The man, known as Ismail, told ABC News he worked in Australia’s Afghanistan embassy for seven years until the terrorist organisation reclaimed the city. 

Ismail says he won’t answer knocks at his door after locals told him the Taliban had lists and were urging residents to dob in anyone who worked for foreign countries. 

‘Our lives are in danger. We have to be a priority of the Australian Government,’ he told ABC National Radio. 

Ismail, who is bunkered down inside his home with his wife and four children and is too frightened to even step into his yard, says he doesn’t care what happens to him but wants protection for his family.

‘I don’t care if the Taliban find me, if they cut me, I don’t care,’ he said. 

‘But if they do something with my wife, that will be a bad shame for me and my family.’

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a press conference earlier this week that Australia would assist in the evacuation of officials, translators and fleeing Afghanis but admitted rescue efforts would be limited.   

‘I want you to know that we will continue to do everything we can for those who have stood with us, as we have to this day,’ he said on Tuesday.

He called on Mr Morrison and other world leaders to stop talking about supporting war-torn nations and start acting with mass rescue efforts

He called on Mr Morrison and other world leaders to stop talking about supporting war-torn nations and start acting with mass rescue efforts

Scott Morrison said in a press conference that Australia would assist in the evacuation of officials, translators and fleeing Afghanis but admitted his rescue efforts will be limited

Scott Morrison said in a press conference that Australia would assist in the evacuation of officials, translators and fleeing Afghanis but admitted his rescue efforts will be limited

‘But… despite our best efforts, I know that support won’t reach all that it should. 

‘On-the-ground events have overtaken many efforts. We wish it were different.’

Ismail said Mr Morrison’s comments left him ‘very disappointed’ and is pleading for the Government to help the people who have risked their lives for Australian government officials. 

‘It breaks my heart into many pieces and left me very disappointed,’ he said. 

‘As a human he has to think first. People who worked on the front line and put themselves in danger to protect your mission.

‘To support your mission in Afghanistan. To support your property, to support your kind.’

He called on Mr Morrison and other world leaders to stop talking about supporting war-torn nations and start acting with mass rescue efforts.

‘If the Australian Government doesn’t speak for human rights and doesn’t help us in Kabul, tragedy and very bad things will happen here at the hands of the Taliban,’ Ismail said.

Australia has deployed 250 troops on three aircrafts to evacuate workers from the Australian embassy and other officials.  

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