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Australian ‘war crimes’: Report alleges 39 Afghan civilians murdered

The world has reacted with disgust and anger after a landmark inquiry into Australian soldiers’ operations in Afghanistan exposed a disturbing litany of alleged war crimes.

Some atrocities levelled against Australian special forces were so vile that over 50 pages in Thursday’s report had to be redacted.

The Australian Defence Force report uncovered a staggering 39 unlawful killings, along with deceit and cover-ups by 25 current or former Australian special forces personnel.

Major General Paul Brereton’s investigation took four and a half years to scrutinise the conduct of special forces soldiers between 2005 and 2016.

The findings point to a culture of violence, mistreatment of war prisoners, and secrecy that allegedly covered up executions.

In light of what has been labelled the ‘most shameful episode in Australia’s military history’, the Special Air Service Regiment’s second squadron will be disbanded, and thousands of soldiers could be stripped of their medals and potentially be prosecuted for war crimes.

A landmark report into Australian war crimes in Afghanistan has exposed dozens of unlawful killings, deceit and cover-ups by 25 current or former Australian special forces personnel (pictured, a soldier in Afghanistan) 

Afghanistan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said it felt ‘disgust’ after viewing the contents of the report but also stated the inquiry was an ‘important step towards justice’.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison had called Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s office earlier today to express his deepest sorrow and assure him that a special investigator would be brought in to prosecute those involved.

The Afghanistan independent Human Rights Commission released a statement condemning the actions of Australian special forces.

‘Clearly demonstrates that Australian forces engaged in murder and brutalisation of Afghans, including children, through deliberate inhumane acts of violence behind which was a consensus that Afghan life, whether of men, women or children, had no inherent worth or dignity,’ the statement said.

‘Only through a series of independent inquiries will we uncover the true extent of this disregard for Afghan life, which normalised murder, and resulted in war crimes.’

Major General Paul Brereton's investigation took four and a half years to scrutinise the conduct of special forces soldiers between 2005 and 2016 (pictured: special force search a village at Musazai in the Uruzgan Province in Afghanistan)

Major General Paul Brereton’s investigation took four and a half years to scrutinise the conduct of special forces soldiers between 2005 and 2016 (pictured: special force search a village at Musazai in the Uruzgan Province in Afghanistan)

Prime Minister Scott Morrison had called Afghan President to express his sorrow

The Afghan Government said they were disgusted by the report (pictured, president, Ashraf Ghani)

Prime Minister Scott Morrison had called Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s office earlier today to express his deepest sorrow and assure him that a special investigator would be brought in to prosecute those involved

Human Rights Watch Australia director Elaine Pearson told Al Jazeera Afghan victims deserve swift and independent justice for the ‘deliberate and cold-blooded killings’.

Amnesty International Australia said although it is important to bring justice, families of the alleged victims should be of equal priority.

‘The full impact upon the families and communities of these 39 murders must be fully explored and appropriate support provided to those families and communities,’ they said.

The Australian Government has now flagged that it will pay compensations to Afghan families whose loved ones were murdered by Australian soldiers.

It is now possible that up to 3,000 soldiers could be stripped of their Meritorious Unit Citation – a medal handed out for ‘sustained outstanding service’ in the special forces.

Potential criminal trials are expected to be heard in the Supreme Court and not a closed-door military tribunal, if the offences rise to the level of war crimes.

One incident in the 456-page report, which was completely redacted, was described as ‘possibly the most disgraceful episode in Australia’s military history’.

Pages upon pages of the 456 page report were redacted for security purposes  (pictured) while individual words and phrases are all that is visible on other pages

Pages upon pages of the 456 page report were redacted for security purposes  (pictured) while individual words and phrases are all that is visible on other pages

One page simply reads: 'Pages 365 - 519 (inclusive) have been removed for security, privacy and legal reasons' (pictured)

One page simply reads: ‘Pages 365 – 519 (inclusive) have been removed for security, privacy and legal reasons’ (pictured)

‘I can’t speak to the particular circumstances,’ Australian Defence Force chief Angus Campbell said.

‘That is why it is redacted. But Justice Brereton does describe something that is utterly disgraceful. It is right that it needs legally to be redacted.

‘In time, in the time of history to be written, it is shameful.’

Another page simply reads: ‘Pages 365 – 519 (inclusive) have been removed for security, privacy and legal reasons.’

But one alleged incident which can be discerned from the document involved two 14-year-old boys who were stopped by SAS, who decided they might be Taliban sympathisers.

The boy’s throats were allegedly slit and their bodies bagged and thrown in a nearby river.

The findings point to a culture of violence, mistreatment of war prisoners and secrecy

The findings point to a culture of violence, mistreatment of war prisoners and secrecy

But what really occurred will only be revealed if the inquiries lead to the successful prosecution of those involved by the Australian Federal Police

But what really occurred will only be revealed if the inquiries lead to the successful prosecution of those involved by the Australian Federal Police

General Campbell apologised for the unlawful killings of prisoners, farmers and other civilians.

‘To the people of Afghanistan on behalf of the Australian Defence Force I sincerely and unreservedly apologise for any wrongdoing by Australian soldiers,’ he said.

‘And to the people of Australia, I am sincerely sorry for any wrongdoing by members of the Australian Defence Force.’ 

Mr Campbell said ‘none of the alleged unlawful killings were described as being in the heat of battle’. 

There was also evidence junior soldiers were required by their patrol commanders to shoot a prisoner in a practice known as ‘blooding’ to achieve their first kill.

‘Typically, the patrol commander would take a person under control and the junior member… would then be directed to kill the person under control,’ the report found.

‘Throwdowns’ – weapons, radios, or other equipment – would be placed with the body and a ‘cover story’ was created for the purposes of operational reporting and to deflect scrutiny.  

One of the killings was described in the report as 'possibly the most disgraceful episode in Australia's military history' but details were completely redacted (Pictured: Chapter 2.50 of the Afghanistan Inquiry report)

One of the killings was described in the report as ‘possibly the most disgraceful episode in Australia’s military history’ but details were completely redacted (Pictured: Chapter 2.50 of the Afghanistan Inquiry report)

Mr Campbell went on to outline how the ‘self-centred warrior culture’ had led to ‘cutting corners, ignoring and bending rules’. 

‘What also emerged was a toxic, competitiveness between the Special Air Service Regiment end of the second commando regiment,’ he said. 

Since 2016, the Inspector-General of the Australian Defence Force has examined allegations of war crimes by Australian special forces in Afghanistan. 

DISTURBING DETAILS ALLEGED IN REPORT: 

Blooding: There was evidence junior soldiers were required by their patrol commanders to shoot a prisoner in a practice known as ‘blooding’ to achieve their first kill.

Throwdowns: Credible evidence suggests some soldiers carried ‘throw downs’, where they left weapons and military equipment on a victim to make it appear the person killed was a legitimate target.

The report was compiled after interviews with 423 witnesses and the analysis of more than 20,000 document and more than 25,000 images. 

Justice Brereton found there was credible evidence of 23 incidents in which a total of 39 Afghan nationals were unlawfully killed.

He identified another two instances where prisoners were treated cruelly by elite Australian troops.

A few of the Afghan nationals killed were not participating in hostilities, while the majority were prisoners of war.

Justice Brereton identified 25 current or former ADF personnel accused of perpetrating one or more war crimes.

The report covered the period from 2005 to 2016, but almost all of the incidents uncovered occurred between 2009 and 2013. 

‘None of these are incidents of disputable decisions made under pressure in the heat of battle,’ the report said.

‘The cases in which it has been found that there is credible information of a war crime are ones in which it was or should have been plain that the person killed was a non-combatant.’

Dozens more allegations investigated could not be substantiated.

Justice Brereton also found there was credible evidence some soldiers carried ‘throw downs’ such as weapons and military equipment to make it appear the person killed was a legitimate target. 

Lieutenant General Angus Campbell (pictured) released the report on Thursday and blasted the culture in the SAS

Lieutenant General Angus Campbell (pictured) released the report on Thursday and blasted the culture in the SAS

It also recommended Australia compensate the families of Afghan people unlawfully killed, without waiting for criminal prosecutions

The inquiry has recommended the chief of defence refer 36 matters to the Australian Federal Police for criminal investigation.

The matters relate to 23 incidents and involve 19 individuals.

Justice Brereton placed the greatest blame on patrol commanders, believing they were most responsible for inciting or directing subordinates to commit war crimes.

Key findings from the report: 

  • Special forces were responsible for 39 unlawful killings, most were prisoners, and were deliberately covered up. 
  • Thirty-nine Afghans were unlawfully killed in 23 incidents, either by special forces or at the instruction of special forces. 
  • None of the killings took place in the heat of battle. 
  • All the killings occurred in circumstances which, if accepted by a jury, would constitute the war crime of murder.  
  • There have been 25 perpetrators identified either as principals or accessories. Some are still serving in the ADF. 

 

‘It was at the patrol commander level that the criminal behaviour was conceived, committed, continued, and concealed, and overwhelmingly at that level that responsibility resides.’

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has previously announced a special investigator will pursue possible criminal prosecutions.

The position is yet to be filled.

The report recommended administrative action be taken against some serving ADF personnel where there is credible evidence of misconduct, but not enough for a criminal conviction.

It also recommended Australia compensate the families of Afghan people unlawfully killed, without waiting for criminal prosecutions.

‘This will be an important step in rehabilitating Australia’s international reputation, in particular with Afghanistan, and it is simply the right thing to do.’

As well, the inquiry recommended various service medals be stripped away from some individuals and groups.

‘It has to be said that what this report discloses is disgraceful and a profound betrayal of the Australian Defence Force’s professional standards and expectations,’ the report said.

‘We embarked on this inquiry with the hope that we would be able to report that the rumours of war crimes were without substance.

‘None of us desired the outcome to which we have come. We are all diminished by it.’ 

Australian Defence Force chief Angus Campbell (pictured) apologised for the unlawful killings of prisoners, farmers and other civilians

Australian Defence Force chief Angus Campbell (pictured) apologised for the unlawful killings of prisoners, farmers and other civilians

As well, the inquiry recommended various service medals be stripped away from some individuals and groups

The alleged crimes: A timeline

2006

* First recorded alleged murder of wounded Afghan prisoner

2009

* Alleged murders of Afghan locals by ADF members with complicity of patrol commander

2010

* Alleged assault and cruel treatment of Afghan prisoner

* Alleged murders of Afghan prisoners with complicity of patrol commander and deletion of evidence to conceal killings

2012

* Various instances of alleged civilian murders by Australian soldiers

* Several alleged murders of prisoners and use of ‘throwdowns’ to conceal killings

* Alleged murders of Afghan locals surrendering to Australian troops

* Alleged assault and cruel treatment of Afghan prisoner

* Alleged murders of Afghan combatants separated from their weapons

2013

* Alleged murder of civilians

* Alleged murder of prisoners

2016

* Inspector-General of ADF asked to investigate rumours of misconduct and war crimes by Australian troops in Afghanistan

* Justice Paul Brereton and his team interviewed more than 400 witnesses and examined tens of thousands of documents during four-year review

2020

* Justice Brereton finalises inquiry

* Chief of Defence Angus Campbell published highly-redacted version of final report

* Credible evidence 25 current and former ADF personnel have committed war crimes

* 19 allegations referred to Australian Federal Police for possible prosecution

* 39 Afghans believed to have been murdered by Australian troops between 2006 and 2016 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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