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Australians flock to Broome, WA, while international borders remain closed due to COVID

An unlikely location in the remote wilds of Western Australia has emerged as the top domestic holiday destination while Australia’s international borders remain closed. 

Broome may not be the first place that springs to mind when you think of a tropical paradise, but that’s exactly where thousands of travel-starved Australians are flocking for white sandy beaches and warm turquoise water.

The sleepy Outback town of just 4,402 residents on Western Australia’s north coast, which at 24 hours’ drive from Perth and a 19-hour journey from Darwin is one of the most isolated in the country,  has become a vibrant beach resort in recent years.

Visitors can watch one of Australia’s ‘best sunsets’ over the pristine sands of Cable Beach or hitch a ride on a camel along the shore.

 

An unlikely location in the remote wilds of Western Australia has emerged as the top domestic holiday destination while Australia’s international borders remain closed

A woman poses for a photo on Cable Beach in Broome, a sleepy Outback town on the north coast of WA that has emerged as Australia's top domestic holiday destination

A woman poses for a photo on Cable Beach in Broome, a sleepy Outback town on the north coast of WA that has emerged as Australia’s top domestic holiday destination

Visitors to the isolated outpost can watch Australia's best sunsets from the pristine sand beach or hitch a ride on a camel

Visitors to the isolated outpost can watch Australia’s best sunsets from the pristine sand beach or hitch a ride on a camel

Broome is known as the 'Gateway to the Kimberley' (pictured), one of the oldest and largest wilderness landscapes in the world

Broome is known as the ‘Gateway to the Kimberley’ (pictured), one of the oldest and largest wilderness landscapes in the world

Broome boasts a plethora of eclectic bars and restaurants for travellers to unwind in after a long day of exploring the wilderness beneath the hot desert sun.

It is known as the ‘Gateway to the Kimberley’, one of the oldest and largest wilderness landscapes in the world.

Photos on Instagram capture the breathtaking landscape and hypnotic colours that paint the sky around dawn and dusk.

One woman said catching one single sunset on the beach was worth the 12-hour drive. 

Photos on Instagram capture the breathtaking landscape characterised by rich red sand

Photos on Instagram capture the breathtaking landscape characterised by rich red sand

This traveller said the 12-hour drive was worth it once she saw the sunset over Cable Beach

This traveller said the 12-hour drive was worth it once she saw the sunset over Cable Beach

Qantas run return flights from Sydney to Broome from $1,447 (AUD) and from Melbourne’s Tullamarine airport to Broome from $1,122 (AUD).

Travellers could also avoid the day-long drive from Perth by flying direct, but it will set you back a minimum of $1,278 return.

Last year research from Skyscanner revealed that more Australians booked flights to Broome for 2021 than any other destination in the country.

A survey by TripAdvisor also found Broome was the most popular holiday destination for Australians looking to get away after experiencing months of lockdowns and interstate travel bans.

Broome boasts pristine beaches and warm, turquoise ocean (pictured)

Broome boasts pristine beaches and warm, turquoise ocean (pictured)

More tourists booked flights to Broome (pictured) than anywhere else in Australia for 2021

More tourists booked flights to Broome (pictured) than anywhere else in Australia for 2021

Meanwhile 10 hours’ drive south, another location in Western Australia is drawing record droves of visitors.

Adventure-seekers are heading to Karijini National Park, an enormous site sprawled over 627,422 hectares just north of the Tropic of Capricorn. 

Karijini is Australia’s second largest national park, only behind Kakadu National Park in the Northern Territory.

Often described as a semi-tropical desert, the park offers spectacular scenery, ancient valleys and gorges, thundering waterfalls as well as a variety of ecosystems found nowhere else on earth.

‘Karijini has a special place in my heart. It is one of the most beautiful national parks I ever visited,’ one visitor wrote on Instagram. 

Adventure-seekers are heading to Karijini National Park (pictured), an enormous site sprawled over 627,422 hectares just north of the Tropic of Capricorn

Adventure-seekers are heading to Karijini National Park (pictured), an enormous site sprawled over 627,422 hectares just north of the Tropic of Capricorn

The park (pictured) is often described as a semi-tropical desert

It offers spectacular scenery, ancient gorges, thundering waterfalls and a variety of ecosystems found nowhere else on earth

Often described as a semi-tropical desert, the park offers spectacular scenery, ancient gorges, thundering waterfalls and a variety of ecosystems found nowhere else on earth

Perhaps the main drawcard are the sparkling swimming holes hidden inside the gorges, which millennials are using as backdrops for social media photos

Perhaps the main drawcard are the sparkling swimming holes hidden inside the gorges, which millennials are using as backdrops for social media photos

But perhaps the main drawcard are the sparkling swimming holes hidden inside the gorges, which millennials are using as backdrops for social media photos.

The images have drawn stunned responses online, with many saying they are determined to visit Australia just to experience the north coast of WA.

‘I need to go here,’ one woman wrote.

‘The colours in these shots are unbelievable,’ said another, while a third added: ‘Next year I will be here.’

Others said the photos had prompted them to put WA top of their bucket lists.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk