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Australia’s main city commuter roads begin to jam up again with Sydney seeing a eight per cent rise

City streets begin to jam up again with Sydney seeing an eight per cent rise in traffic this week

  • Congestion level index on capital cities was released by data supplier TomTom
  • It found congestion significantly dropped during the peak of coronavirus
  • But traffic in all major cities, especially Sydney, have already begun to climb 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

As Australian main cities roll back coronavirus restrictions, roads across the country have already been jammed up with Sydney traffic rising by eight per cent this week. 

A congestion level index covering all capital cities was released by data supplier and GPS manufacturer TomTom and it revealed congestion significantly dropped in Australia during COVID-19. 

Sydney usually records congestion levels of 70 to 80 per cent on weekdays but dropped to around 32 per cent over the past few months due to travel restrictions and social distancing. 

But traffic levels have already increased to 40 per cent – with the rest of the major cities following a similar trend – as restrictions are eased, people are urged to avoid public transport, students return to school part-time and people return to work.  

A congestion level index covering all capital cities was released by data supplier and GPS manufacturer TomTom and it revealed congestion significantly dropped in Australia during COVID-19

Sydney usually records congestion levels of 70 to 80 per cent on weekdays but dropped to around 32 per cent over the past few months due to travel restrictions and social distancing

Sydney usually records congestion levels of 70 to 80 per cent on weekdays but dropped to around 32 per cent over the past few months due to travel restrictions and social distancing

TomTom’s data measures the percentage of extra time during a normally 30-minute drive.  

A 100 per cent increase in congestion would mean that 30-minute drive would take an hour.  

Melbourne’s traffic levels usually sit at 60 to 70 per cent but dropped to 30 per cent during the peak of the coronavirus. 

The city’s traffic has risen by five per cent even though restrictions in Victoria remain tight. 

Brisbane has seen the smallest rise in traffic levels, with an increase of two per cent compared to last week.  

The capital of Queensland usually records a congestion level of about 60 to 70 per cent but dropped last week to 28 per cent. 

But traffic levels have already increased to 40 per cent - with the rest of the major cities following a similar trend - as restrictions are eased, people are urged to avoid public transport, students return to school part-time and people return to work

But traffic levels have already increased to 40 per cent – with the rest of the major cities following a similar trend – as restrictions are eased, people are urged to avoid public transport, students return to school part-time and people return to work

As Australians return to work and school, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian urged commuters to avoid public transport, which will further increase congestion on the roads

As Australians return to work and school, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian urged commuters to avoid public transport, which will further increase congestion on the roads

As Australians return to work and school, NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian urged commuters to avoid public transport. 

She said the reason coronavirus spread overseas is due to infected people using public transport. 

‘We don’t want any more people, at this stage, catching public transport in the peak,’ Ms Berejiklian said this morning. 

TomTom Asia Pacific Vice President Phil Allen told 9News that commuters avoiding public transport altogether will see an increase in congestion. 

‘We’ve been having a number of conversations with the authorities around how we can do this a bit smarter going forward,’ Mr Allen said. 

‘We’ve had six weeks of this being normal, is there a way we can prevent people just returning to their old habits? 

‘The school holidays are a classic example, we see every time how much it improves traffic flow. It doesn’t take a huge change in behaviour to make a big difference.’   

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk