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Baby crocodiles sound like laser guns as they greet their keeper at a Florida wildlife center

Baby crocodiles sound like laser guns in a video game as they greet their keeper at a Florida wildlife center

  • Brad Valle recorded the video at Dragonwood Conservancy in Pine Lakes, Florida
  • Thirteen baby Cuban crocodiles plod around in a plastic, white tub full of water 
  • The sound they make sounds exactly like laser gun sounds from old video games 

The answer to one of life’s great questions has been answered – what exactly do baby crocodiles sound like?

It turns out the answer is perhaps more familiar than many would have anticipated. 

Adorable footage shows a bask of baby crocodiles making noises that sound a lot like laser guns from vintage video games.

The video was recorded by their keeper, Brad Valle, at the The Dragonwood Wildlife Conservancy organisation in Pine Lakes, Florida.

In the video, 13 baby Cuban crocodiles, which are distinguished by their black and yellow speckles, can be seen plodding around.

The video was recorded by their keeper, Brad Valle, at the The Dragonwood Wildlife Conservancy organisation in Pine Lakes, Florida

Adorable footage shows a bask of baby crocodiles making noises that sound a lot like laser guns from vintage video games

They have been placed in a white, plastic tub that has been filled with a few inches of water.

The group are continually communicating to each other with a series of noises that sound as if laser guns are being fired back and forth like in a video game. 

Brad extends his hand into the tub as several of the newborns start climbing up the ramp.

One enthusiastic youngster slowly even crawls up his hand.

Brad starts talking to the group and says: ‘What? You’re a sweetheart.’

Brad starts talking to the group and says: 'What? You're a sweetheart.'

Brad extends his hand into the tub as several of the newborns start climbing up the ramp

Brad extends his hand into the tub as several of the newborns start climbing up the ramp

As a second of the baby reptiles also scrambles onto the keeper, he adds: ‘You’d all climb all over me if you could.

‘So precious.’ 

The Dragonwood Wildlife Conservancy is a non-profit organisation that is dedicated to the conservation of threatened endangered and critically endangered reptiles.

Cuban crocodiles: A critically endangered species

Cuban crocodiles have a conservation status of ‘Critically Endangered’. 

As adults, they can grow up to 11.5 feet (3.5 metres) in length and have a life expectancy of anywhere between 50 and 75 years in the wild.

Cuban Crocodiles mainly feed on fish, small mammals and turtles but they can also leap from the water, using powerful tail thrusts below the surface. This allows them to catch birds and smaller mammals from overhanging branches.

When in groups the crocodiles form a dominance hierarchy based on gender, size and temperament.

They also have the smallest geographical range of any crocodile as they encompass an area less than 200 square miles (500 square kilometers). They are now only found in Cuba’s Zapata Swamp in the southwest and Lanier Swamp on Isla de Juventud.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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