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Barefoot bushman confronts 4.5m croc that mauled his hand

For most people bone-crunching jaws, lightning fast speed and weight often exceeding 1000 kilograms is enough reason to steer clear of the world’s largest living reptile.

But not crocodile enthusiast Robert Bredl, who fearlessly climbs aboard the backs of the monstrous creatures and feeds them while wearing no shoes. 

Last year however the ‘Barefoot Bushman’ was caught off guard by one of the 48 crocodiles on his far north Queensland farm, nearly costing himself a hand.

‘Barefoot Bushman’ Robert Bredl fearlessly climbs aboard the backs of giant crocodiles and feeds them while wearing no shoes at his Queensland wildlife farm

Last year Mr Bredl (pictured) was caught off guard by one of the 48 crocodiles on his far north Queensland farm, nearly costing himself a hand

Last year Mr Bredl (pictured) was caught off guard by one of the 48 crocodiles on his far north Queensland farm, nearly costing himself a hand

Now, Mr Bredl is set to introduce film crews to the 4.5 metre beast who ‘turned on him’ almost exactly a year ago on Sunday night’s episode of 60 Minutes.

In a show preview, the daring wildlife warrior can be seen sitting atop a croc while scratching its ‘tickly spot’ with a stick.

The ‘real-life Mick Dundee’ then makes use of his fine tuned ‘snappy feet’, quickly side-stepping out of chomping range as ‘Charlie’ lunges at a prod from his stick.

‘Jeez that was close’ he exclaims as he narrowly avoids receiving a nip from the hungry croc.

Mr Bredl is set to introduce film crews to the 4.5 metre beast who 'turned on him' and chomped his hand almost exactly a year ago

Mr Bredl is set to introduce film crews to the 4.5 metre beast who ‘turned on him’ and chomped his hand almost exactly a year ago

In a show preview, the daring wildlife warrior can be seen sitting atop a croc while scratching its 'tickly spot' with a stick

In a show preview, the daring wildlife warrior can be seen sitting atop a croc while scratching its ‘tickly spot’ with a stick

The 67-year-old renowned wildlife filmmaker had his hand partially severed and suffered extensive puncture wounds to his arm and leg on September 22, 2016.

The monster reptile, Tripod, rolled and tried to drag him into the water in front of tourists after a feeding session went wrong at Bredl’s Wild Farm.

He was flown to Mackay Base Hospital and later received 12 surgeries to rebuild his hand after every bone in his wrist was broken. 

The 'real-life Mick Dundee' makes use of his fine tuned 'snappy feet', quickly side-stepping out of chomping range as 'Charlie' lunges at a prod from his stick

The ‘real-life Mick Dundee’ makes use of his fine tuned ‘snappy feet’, quickly side-stepping out of chomping range as ‘Charlie’ lunges at a prod from his stick

'Jeez that was close' he exclaims as he narrowly avoids receiving a nip from the hungry croc

‘Jeez that was close’ he exclaims as he narrowly avoids receiving a nip from the hungry croc

Mr Bredl claims crocs are less dangerous than most people think and explains it was his own personal error, or ‘brain fart’, that caused the near-fatal attack.

He generally relies on the science of animal behaviour to keep himself out of harms way, but on that particular occasion, he experienced a momentary slip-up.   

The episode will air on Network Nine at 8.30pm. 

Mr Bredl claims crocs are less dangerous than most people think and explains it was his own personal error, or 'brain fart', that caused the near-fatal attack

Mr Bredl claims crocs are less dangerous than most people think and explains it was his own personal error, or ‘brain fart’, that caused the near-fatal attack

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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