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Bassam Hamzy has charges over prison yard brawl dropped

One of Australia’s most notorious prisoners who traded blows with a terrorist inside the nation’s most secure jail won’t be prosecuted for his actions. 

Bassam Hamzy and Talal Alameddine stood toe-to-toe inside an exercise yard at the Goulburn Supermax in October last year after an argument over prisoner hierarchy.

CCTV from inside the prison shows Alameddine, 25, landing vicious blows on Hamzy, 40, for a minute before the older criminal drags his rival into a non-monitored room.

Daily Mail Australia understands that although on the backfoot during the early initial brawl, inside that room Hamzy gained the upper hand in the heavyweight battle.

The NSW Director of Public Prosecutions dropped a charge of affray against Hamzy on August 8, but is still pursuing Alameddine for allegedly instigating the fight.

 

Alameddine (pictured) is still facing a single charge of common assault over the October 2018 brawl inside Goulburn's Supermax Prison

Notorious prisoner Bassam Hamzy (left) has had charges laid against him dropped over a jail yard fight with convicted terrorist Talal Alameddine (right). Alameddine is still facing a single charge of common assault over the October 2018 brawl inside Goulburn’s Supermax Prison

Hamzy’s lawyers had insisted from the outset that the notorious inmate had acted in self defence and eventually the court agreed. 

He applied to have the DPP pay his court costs after the charges were dropped, but that motion was refused. 

He is now appealing that Local Court decision to the New South Wales District Court.

Alameddine was initially facing one charge of affray and one of common assault, but is now just facing the later charge.

Hamzy and Alameddine came to blows during their routine morning exercise break on October 28, 2018.

The older inmate was due to represent himself in court the next day, but was unable to do so.

‘It would appear he’s been assaulted,’ lawyer Zali Burrows, who is representing him in a Supreme Court matter, told the NSW District Court last October.

‘He has a black eye, is currently in segregation and he’s also got food poisoning.’

Hamzy – who founded criminal syndicate Brothers 4 Life from behind bars – will be in jail until at least 2035 for a variety of crimes.

He was first jailed for 21 years in 2002 over the murder of Kris Toumazis, who he shot dead outside a Sydney nightclub in 1998.

Once behind bars he was involved in a litany of headline-making incidents.

Hamzy was doing push ups in the exercise yard (pictured) moments before he was confronted by Alameddine

Hamzy was doing push ups in the exercise yard (pictured) moments before he was confronted by Alameddine

Hamzy and Alameddine's fight in the exercise yard (like the one pictured) began after a reported argument over prisoner hierarchy

After a minute of fighting, the two inmates can no longer be seen on CCTV. It is understood Hamzy dragged Alameddine from the yard back into a cell (like the one pictured) and landed more several blows

Hamzy and Alameddine’s fight began after a reported argument over prisoner hierarchy, with the younger man squaring up to his older and highly feared inmate. After a minute of fighting, the two inmates can no longer be seen on CCTV. It is understood Hamzy dragged Alameddine from the yard (like image left) back into a cell (like image right) and landed more several blows 

Alameddine pleaded guilty to supplying the gun used to killed NSW Police accountant Curtis Cheng (pictured)

Raban Alou (pictured) was sentenced to 17 years in prison for his attack on Mr Cheng in October 2017

Alameddine refused to stand for a judge when he was sentenced in May 2018 to a maximum 17 years in prison for supplying the gun used by Raban Alou (right) to kill NSW police accountant Curtis Cheng (left)

Mr Cheng was shot dead outside the Parramatta police headquarters in October, 2015 (above)

Mr Cheng was shot dead outside the Parramatta police headquarters in October, 2015 (above)

In 2008 he masterminded a methylamphetamine ring from inside prison, delivering more than a kilogram of the drug to Melbourne under the guise of a truck business.

Running the business through a phone hidden in his Lithgow cell, Hamzy made 19,523 calls in just a matter of weeks.

Earlier this year Hamzy was again charged with running another drug ring. 

Hamzy’s earliest release date is June 14, 2035.

Despite housing infamous criminals such as Ivan Milat, Goulburn Supermax has been dubbed ‘super mosque’ in recent years because of the high rate of Islamic prisoners. 

Alameddine refused to stand for a judge when he was sentenced in May 2018 to a maximum 17 years in prison.

He had pleaded guilty to supplying the revolver used to murder Curtis Cheng at the Parramatta Police Headquarters in 2015.

Alameddine was also guilty of recklessly possessing the same weapon in preparation for an act of terrorism.  

Alameddine will return to Goulburn Local Court on September 11 to face his charge of common assault. 

Hamzy (right, pictured before he was jailed in 2002) will not be eligible for release from prison until 2035 at the earliest

Hamzy (right, pictured before he was jailed in 2002) will not be eligible for release from prison until 2035 at the earliest

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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