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Best&Less boss reveals why he hates self-serve checkouts

The owner of one of Australia’s biggest department stores has revealed why he will never replace his cashiers with self-serve checkouts.

Rod Orrock, chief executive of budget chain store Best&Less, admits the technology behind self-checkout machines drives him ‘insane’ and refuses to follow in the footsteps of rivals Kmart and Big W.

Speaking with news.com.au, Mr Orrock said he believes his customers should never be forced to ‘do the retailers work’ by scanning their own products and paying a machine. 

Rod Orrock, chief executive of budget chain store Best&Less, (pictured) admits the technology behind self-checkout machines (pictured) drives him ‘insane’ and refuses to follow in the footsteps of rivals Kmart and Big W

 Speaking with news.com.au , Mr Orrock said he believes his customers should never be forced to 'do the retailers work' by scanning their own products and paying a machine (Self-serve checkout at Coles pictured)

 Speaking with news.com.au , Mr Orrock said he believes his customers should never be forced to ‘do the retailers work’ by scanning their own products and paying a machine (Self-serve checkout at Coles pictured)

‘Personally, it drives me insane when I turn up to the checkout with a full basket and I have to do the retailer’s work for them,’ he said.

‘Check-outs are a key touch point between customers and the company, they can come with their questions and talk to our staff and I think that’s really important.’

He added that the majority of Best&Less customers are mums and families who are more suited to face-to-face interactions with cashiers. 

It is a belief shared by the brains behind German-based supermarket chain Aldi.

Alongside operating some of the most efficient check-out lanes in the world, the grocery giant found the overwhelming majority of its customers actually want to be served by a real person.

WHAT PEOPLE HATE ABOUT SELF-SERVE CHECKOUTS 

‘Item removed from bagging area’ warning 

Having to sift through the fruit and vegetables options to select correct one 

Not being able to find the right product because it is under a different name

Scanning all items to find out the machine is either ‘card only’ or ‘cash only’

Not being able to cross off an item without having to flag a server down 

Waiting in line because the person in front of you can’t use the self checkout

The barcode won’t scan properly no matter how many angles you try 

When you have too many items and you run out of bagging area

Retail giants Big W, Kmart, Woolworths and Coles have all slowly implemented self-serve checkouts at all stores across Australia – but the robotic cashiers haven’t always been welcomed with open arms.

Market research performed at the cusp of the ‘self-serve’ revolution found most shoppers were intimidated or frustrated by the finicky technology. 

The biggest problems customers have with the machines was found to be the infuriating ‘removed from bagging area’ warning, having to sift through the fruit and vegetables options to select correct one and not being able to find the right product because it is under a different name. 

While Best&Less refuses to follow the latest trends in point-of-sale technology, it is leading the charge in budget clothing. 

As Australian children gear up to head back to school for another year on Monday, the department store is wooing parents with ultra-cheap uniform packages.

Retail giants Big W, Kmart, Woolworths and Coles have all slowly implemented self-serve checkouts at all stores across Australia - but the robotic cashiers haven't always been welcomed with open arms (Stock image)

Retail giants Big W, Kmart, Woolworths and Coles have all slowly implemented self-serve checkouts at all stores across Australia – but the robotic cashiers haven’t always been welcomed with open arms (Stock image)

Market research performed at the cusp of the 'self-serve' revolution found most shoppers were intimidated or frustrated by the finicky technology (Stock image)

Market research performed at the cusp of the ‘self-serve’ revolution found most shoppers were intimidated or frustrated by the finicky technology (Stock image)

The brains behind German-based supermarket giant Aldi (pictured) also refuse to install self-serve checkouts

The brains behind German-based supermarket giant Aldi (pictured) also refuse to install self-serve checkouts

The store is selling complete school uniforms for under $10 – a pair of shorts for $6, a pair of socks for $1 and tshirtsfor $2.75.

Speaking about the outrageous pricing of uniform shops, Best&Less boss Mr Orrock slammed schools for overcharging or directing parents to expensive retailers. 

‘Why should I pay $25 to my school for a polo just because it has a printed emblem? That shouldn’t make it 10 times more expensive. For people on lower incomes they may choose another school if they can’t afford the uniform costs,’ he told the publication.  

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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