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Bizarre conspiracy theories behind why flight attendants spray plane cabins in Australia

Cancer-causing, mind-controlling and a secret government plot: The bizarre conspiracy theories behind why flight attendants spray plane cabins before landing in Australia – but there’s a simple explanation

  • Spray is frequently used on aircraft flying from Asia and landing in Australia
  • Some passengers expressed their concerns with the ingredients of the spray
  • Others suggested outlandish conspiracy theories as to what the spray does 

Travellers have come up with a series of bizarre conspiracy theories related to a mist sprayed inside plane cabins before landing in Australia.

The sprayis frequently used on aircraft flying in from Asia, and its dispersal is sometimes acknowledged with an explanation announcement.

Some passengers have expressed their concerns about the spray, saying they don’t know what it is or what purpose it serves.

‘My concern is… what is the spray and ingredients. I may be a little old fashioned but I would have liked information on this prior to just spraying after an Australian government announcement which never mentioned the spray,’ one concerned traveller from Bali to Australia posted online. 

Travellers have come up with a series of bizarre conspiracy theories related to a mist sprayed inside plane cabins before landing in Australia

Some passengers have expressed their concerns about the spray, saying they don't know what it is or what purpose it serves

Some passengers have expressed their concerns about the spray, saying they don’t know what it is or what purpose it serves

Some people suggested outlandish conspiracy theories as to what the purpose of the spray was.

‘It’s a cancer-causing insecticide spray and a lot of people I flew with (who still fly) have cancer,’ one person suggested in a social media post.

‘Accumulation is the issue so if you fly infrequently then just detox well afterwards. Many airline staff are fighting this. Use a mask.’

Another traveller suggested the spray was ‘vaccinating’.

‘You do know that there is an agenda to depopulate this rock called Earth and what better way to depopulate than by chemicals and viruses to make you sick, this way they can make a heap of money off you before you die, it’s all about the money honey…’ they said.

One airline passenger said the mist was poisonous.

‘Just another way the new world order government is slowly killing everyone,’  they said.  

Another made a sarcastic suggestion that the spray was a secret government plot.

One airline passenger said the mist was poisonous

Some people suggested outlandish conspiracy theories as to what the purpose of the spray was

‘It’s an Indonesian government plot. Eventually through the use of such sprays our minds will be controlled,’ he said.

‘A time will come when the secret ingredient will be activated and your mind will no longer be your own. You will feel an uncontrollable urge to book another trip back to Bali where you will be equally as unable to prevent yourself from buying Bintang after Bintang… It’s a fate worse than death itself.’ 

The spraying of plane cabins is known as ‘aircraft disinsection’ and is based on World Health Organisation recommendations. 

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources website states that ‘all aircraft entering Australia must be treated in a manner approved by the Director of Human Biosecurity’.

‘Disinsection’ is the procedure where insects in baggage, cargo or containers are killed.

Four types of disinsection are used in Australia: residual, a spray lasting eight weeks is carried out while no passengers are onboard; pre-embarkation, a spray done up to 40 minutes before passengers board, lasting for a single flight; pre-flight and top of descent, a two-part process where a spray is done before and during a flight; and on-arrival, spraying when the aircraft lands.

Another made a sarcastic suggestion that the spray was a secret government plot

Why do planes need to be sprayed?

Many countries require disinsection of aircraft arriving from countries where diseases that are spread by insects, such as malaria and yellow fever, occur. 

There have been a number of cases of malaria affecting individuals who live or work in the vicinity of airports in countries where malaria is not present, thought to be due to the escape of malaria-carrying mosquitoes transported on aircraft. 

Some countries, e.g. Australia and New Zealand, routinely carry out disinsection to prevent the inadvertent introduction of species that may harm their agriculture.

Disinsection is a public health measure that is recommended by the World Health Organisation.

The different procedures currently in use are: treatment of the interior of the aircraft using a quick-acting insecticide spray immediately before take-off, with the passengers on board; treatment of the interior of the aircraft on the ground before passengers come on board, using a residual-insecticide aerosol, plus additional in-flight treatment with a quick-acting spray shortly before landing; and regular application of a residual insecticide to all internal surfaces of the aircraft, except those in food preparation areas.

Passengers are sometimes concerned about their exposure to insecticide sprays during air travel, and some have reported feeling unwell after spraying of aircraft for disinsection.

However, the WHO has found no evidence that the specified insecticide sprays are harmful to human health when used as recommended.

Source: World Health Organisation 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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