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Bob Dylan’s Blonde on Blonde album cover photographer Jerry Schatzberg unseen photos  

For more than six decades, photographer Jerry Schatzberg has used his camera lens to capture dozens of A-listers, artists, politicians and elite musicians. Jimi Hendrix, Aretha Franklin, Andy Warhol, Sammy Davis Jr., Duke of Windsor (the abdicated King Edward VIII) and Ted Kennedy have all posed for him. But of all the high-profile individuals the 91-year-old photographer has interacted with, Bob Dylan was his best photographic subject. As Schatzberg says: ‘You just point the camera at him and things happen.’

By June 1965, when he first met Dylan, Schatzberg was already a well-established celebrity and fashion photographer. The singer, who in the previous year began to go into a new musical direction of folk-rock pop-music, was in the middle of recording his sixth album, Highway 61 Revisited. He invited Schatzberg to a Manhattan music studio where he gave the photographer free rein to shoot every moment which produced a collection of images showing a young Dylan like never before.  

Over the following years, Schatzberg and Dylan forged a friendship as he continued to capture hundreds of dynamic photos of the Blowing in the Wind singer.

Now, more than 53 years later, Schatzberg is releasing a book titled Dylan By Schatzberg that showcases a comprehensive collection of both photos and countless stories.

Speaking to DailyMail.com from his spacious apartment near Central Park, Schatzberg said he first discovered Dylan’s music after a friend recommended he listen to it. Once he did, he was ‘knocked out’.

‘I just couldn’t believe somebody could write things like how Bob did,’ he said.

 

Now, more than 53 years later, Schatzberg is releasing a book titled Dylan By Schatzberg that showcases a comprehensive collection of both photos and countless stories. Dylan is pictured above posing inside of Schatzberg photography studio in 1965

Renowned photographer and film director Jerry Schatzberg captured hundreds of images of Bob Dylan during the mid-1960s, including the cover photo for the singer’s Blonde on Blonde album. Now, more than 53 years later, Schatzberg is releasing a book titled Dylan By Schatzberg that showcases a comprehensive collection of both photos and countless stories. Dylan is pictured above posing inside of Schatzberg photography studio in 1965

For more than six decades,  Schatzberg has used his camera lens to capture dozens of A-listers, artists, politicians and elite musicians. Jimi Hendrix, Aretha Franklin, Andy Warhol, Sammy Davis Jr., Duke of Windsor (the abdicated King Edward VIII) and Ted Kennedy have all posed for him. But of all the high-profile individuals the 91-year-old photographer has interacted with,  Dylan was his best photographic subject. As Schatzberg says: 'You just point the camera at him and things happen.’ The singer is pictured above in a photo while smoking a cigarette in 1965

For more than six decades, Schatzberg has used his camera lens to capture dozens of A-listers, artists, politicians and elite musicians. Jimi Hendrix, Aretha Franklin, Andy Warhol, Sammy Davis Jr., Duke of Windsor (the abdicated King Edward VIII) and Ted Kennedy have all posed for him. But of all the high-profile individuals the 91-year-old photographer has interacted with, Dylan was his best photographic subject. As Schatzberg says: ‘You just point the camera at him and things happen.’ The singer is pictured above in a photo while smoking a cigarette in 1965

Schatzberg shared that the pair became fast friends and would often hang out together along with other musicians at restaurants or night clubs. The photographer remarked that people have often asked if the out-of-focus image on the cover of Blonde on Blonde represented a drug trip. It doesn’t. They were just really, really cold. ‘It was something that actually is an honest image. He was cold and I was shaking, I was cold and the camera was shaking,' he said. Pictured above is another image taken of Dylan from the same shoot for the Blonde on Blonde cover in the Meat Packing District of Manhattan 

Schatzberg shared that the pair became fast friends and would often hang out together along with other musicians at restaurants or night clubs. The photographer remarked that people have often asked if the out-of-focus image on the cover of Blonde on Blonde represented a drug trip. It doesn’t. They were just really, really cold. ‘It was something that actually is an honest image. He was cold and I was shaking, I was cold and the camera was shaking,’ he said. Pictured above is another image taken of Dylan from the same shoot for the Blonde on Blonde cover in the Meat Packing District of Manhattan 

Schatzberg was so moved that he asked a mutual friend if the musician would agree to being photographed. The next day he was surprised to receive a phone call from Dylan’s then-wife, Sara Dylan. Her husband had agreed. 

‘I showed up the next day and he was great,’ Schatzberg said of his initial encounter with Dylan in a recording studio in 1965. ‘Immediately he wanted me to hear something that he had just recorded. I was a little intimidated, but it was great.’

Schatzberg explained that after showing him the first set of photos he captured with his Nikon camera that Dylan liked them and agreed to being photographed more by Schatzberg, who was then aged 38 and had already shot covers for Vogue, Life, Esquire and Glamour.

‘The first set of pictures were done in the studio pretty much under his control. …He would feel at home in the recording studio where he knows everything that’s going on. And so I asked him to come to my studio and he said yeah,’ Schatzberg said.

‘I didn’t tell him that I wanted him to come to my studio because I have more control there. I wanted to be the boss. 

‘After we got to know each other, we had no problem at all, anything I suggested he took in his mind and we built a good relationship. He was just like anybody else. He was very funny and he’s a very special talent.’

Schatzberg, pictured above at home in his apartment with his new book, remarked: ‘After we got to know each other, we had no problem at all, anything I suggested he took in his mind and we built a good relationship. He was just like anybody else. He was very funny and he’s a very special talent'

Schatzberg, pictured above at home in his apartment with his new book, remarked: ‘After we got to know each other, we had no problem at all, anything I suggested he took in his mind and we built a good relationship. He was just like anybody else. He was very funny and he’s a very special talent’

During some of Dylan’s early performances, Schatzberg recounted how he did not always receive rave reviews from his audiences. When Dylan showcased a few new songs from his album Highway 61 Revisited while performing on August 28, 1965, he was booed. ‘He said “f*** ‘em, I don't care” in response to being booed. He knew what he wanted to do with his music – he was a country singer, folk singer and that’s a certain style,’ Schatzberg said. Dylan is pictured above in an image he captured during  a performance in the 1960s

During some of Dylan’s early performances, Schatzberg recounted how he did not always receive rave reviews from his audiences. When Dylan showcased a few new songs from his album Highway 61 Revisited while performing on August 28, 1965, he was booed. ‘He said ‘f*** ’em, I don’t care’ in response to being booed. He knew what he wanted to do with his music – he was a country singer, folk singer and that’s a certain style,’ Schatzberg said. Dylan is pictured above in an image he captured during  a performance in the 1960s

The pair became fast friends and soon enough were hanging out at night clubs and dining together at restaurants.

During some of Dylan’s early performances, Schatzberg recounted how he did not always receive rave reviews from his audiences. When Dylan showcased a few new songs from his album Highway 61 Revisited while performing on August 28, 1965, he was booed. 

‘He said ‘f*** ’em, I don’t care’ in response to being booed. He knew what he wanted to do with his music – he was a country singer, folk singer and that’s a certain style,’ Schatzberg said.  

A few months later, the renowned photographer was trying to capture images of the singer for his Blonde on Blonde album cover inside his studio. 

‘We did the cover for Blonde on Blonde down in the Meat Packing District. It was the beginning of February 1966, so it was very cold and he was wearing a light jacket,’ he recalled of the chilly weather, which can be as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit (-6 Celsius). 

‘So I asked him if he would go outside because I didn’t like the shots I was getting into the studio. It was okay, but it wasn’t something special. So he said yeah and had on a little jacket.

Of Dylan, Schatzberg said: ‘I think of him as one of my greatest subject matters and I protect that a lot. I still do today, I just won’t give my pictures to everybody or sell them to everybody.' Dylan is pictured above holding a picture frame as prop inside Schatzberg's photography studio in the mid-1960s

Of Dylan, Schatzberg said: ‘I think of him as one of my greatest subject matters and I protect that a lot. I still do today, I just won’t give my pictures to everybody or sell them to everybody.’ Dylan is pictured above holding a picture frame as prop inside Schatzberg’s photography studio in the mid-1960s

The photographer added: ‘I made him feel that he could do anything he wanted and it would be okay, and I didn’t impose things on him that he felt was silly. He was able to make somethings up, you can see in my photographs.' The iconic singer is pictured above in a striking photo captured by Schatzberg inside his photography studio 

The photographer added: ‘I made him feel that he could do anything he wanted and it would be okay, and I didn’t impose things on him that he felt was silly. He was able to make somethings up, you can see in my photographs.’ The iconic singer is pictured above in a striking photo captured by Schatzberg inside his photography studio 

‘Bob was cold… I was cold, the camera was shaking’: Blonde on Blonde cover is blurry because it was shot on a freezing day

Renowned photographer Jerry Schatzberg was trying to shoot photos of Bob Dylan for the singer’s Blonde on Blonde album cover inside his photography studio. 

‘We did the cover for Blonde on Blonde down in the Meat Packing District. It was the beginning of February 1966, so it was very cold and he was wearing a light jacket,’ he recalled of the chilly weather, which can be as low as 20 degrees Fahrenheit (-6 Celsius). 

Dylan pictured above on his Blonde on Blonde album cover shot by Schatzberg

Dylan pictured above on his Blonde on Blonde album cover shot by Schatzberg

‘So I asked him if he would go outside because I didn’t like the shots I was getting into the studio. It was okay, but it wasn’t something special. So he said yeah and had on a little jacket.

‘I’m not going to put on a big heavy coat even though I know it’s cold out because he’s just in a little jacket. What can I do? So we went out, just the two of us. The camera was moving and shaking and that’s how the image came out and he just liked it.’ 

‘I’m not going to put on a big heavy coat even though I know it’s cold out because he’s just in a little jacket. 

‘What can I do? So we went out, just the two of us. The camera was moving and shaking and that’s how the image came out and he just liked it.’

He remarked that people have often asked if the out-of-focus image on the cover of the album represented a drug trip. It doesn’t. They were just really, really cold. 

‘It was something that actually is an honest image. 

‘He was cold and I was shaking, I was cold and the camera was shaking.’

Schatzberg added that while selecting the images to use for his seventh studio album that Dylan didn’t just use photos of himself.

‘There is a picture of me, a self-portrait that he took off the wall and he put that in,’ he shared. 

‘He just put what he wanted and I don’t get a written credit on the album, just have my picture there and that’s good enough for me. 

‘We’ve never discussed it, even till this day and I think it’s his way of saying ‘thank you.’

The early editions of the album, there was a photo of Italian actress Claudia Cardinale biting her lip included that Dylan first saw lying around on a table inside the photo studio and wanted it for the album.

‘But shortly after Blonde on Blonde was released, her people wanted the photo removed so Columbia [Dylan’s then record label] removed the image from further funs,’ the photographer said.

‘She probably doesn’t know what she came out of and Dylan is now a legend.

I see her once and a while and I tried to explain what happened, but she couldn’t understand. 

‘So she still doesn’t know that she was in the Dylan album.’

He also shared a story about how he was out to dinner with Dylan and his wife at a restaurant that Schatzberg selected, but the singer didn’t feel comfortable. 

‘I chose a place that I thought was popular and he was getting quite popular by then, so he showed up and about a half hour in, I don’t think he felt comfortable,’ the photographer recalled.

‘He excused himself and came back in 10 minutes and said that a car was picking him up. 

‘He just didn’t want to be there so he left us, including his wife. I realized that you can’t put a normal behavior onto somebody like him because he’s not normal.

‘He doesn’t write normal, he’s a very special talent.’  

Schatzberg said, ‘He’s just got something to him and I felt working with him and knowing him, I was able to get into his soul and get deeper into him and a lot of my photographs I look at them and I find them amazing.’ The Blowing in the Wind singer is pictured above looking deeply into the camera in another image captured by Schatzberg inside his studio 

Schatzberg said, ‘He’s just got something to him and I felt working with him and knowing him, I was able to get into his soul and get deeper into him and a lot of my photographs I look at them and I find them amazing.’ The Blowing in the Wind singer is pictured above looking deeply into the camera in another image captured by Schatzberg inside his studio 

Schatzberg said that Dylan is 'a very special talent' and the images that are included of him in his new book showcase that. The Like a Rolling Stone singer is pictured above releasing cigarette smoke in a striking image that Schatzberg captured in the mid-1960s

Schatzberg said that Dylan is ‘a very special talent’ and the images that are included of him in his new book showcase that. The Like a Rolling Stone singer is pictured above releasing cigarette smoke in a striking image that Schatzberg captured in the mid-1960s

Schatzberg’s book also reveals a several stories about his experiences with Dylan during the 1960s while showcasing dozens of images that coincide with those stories. The now-77-year-old musician is pictured above in an image while smoking a cigarette and holding a prop inside Schatzberg's photography studio in the mid-1960s

Schatzberg’s book also reveals a several stories about his experiences with Dylan during the 1960s while showcasing dozens of images that coincide with those stories. The now-77-year-old musician is pictured above in an image while smoking a cigarette and holding a prop inside Schatzberg’s photography studio in the mid-1960s

Schatzberg, who has also directed several films starring Willie Nelson, Morgan Freeman, Faye Dunaway and Al Pacino, said that he and Dylan haven't seen each other since they both were guests at a mutual friends wedding in the 1970s as both of their careers had moved into different directions and locations. Schatzberg is pictured above left posing alongside Dylan while they both use props inside of his photography studio

Schatzberg, who has also directed several films starring Willie Nelson, Morgan Freeman, Faye Dunaway and Al Pacino, said that he and Dylan haven’t seen each other since they both were guests at a mutual friends wedding in the 1970s as both of their careers had moved into different directions and locations. Schatzberg is pictured above left posing alongside Dylan while they both use props inside of his photography studio

Dylan By Schatzberg will go on sale in the United States on October 25 and can be purchased in the U.K. beginning on October 1

Dylan By Schatzberg will go on sale in the United States on October 25 and can be purchased in the U.K. beginning on October 1

Schatzberg’s book also reveals a several stories about his experiences with Dylan during the 1960s while showcasing dozens of images that coincide with those stories.

‘Mostly towards the end of the book, we use a lot of props because they were just things hanging around my studio. I’d give him a drum and he straddled the drum or do something else, because he didn’t feel that I was going to make him look like a fool or anything,’ the award-winning photographer stated.

‘I think of him as one of my greatest subject matters and I protect that a lot. I still do today, I just won’t give my pictures to everybody or sell them to everybody.

‘I made him feel that he could do anything he wanted and it would be okay, and I didn’t impose things on him that he felt was silly. He was able to make somethings up, you can see in my photographs.

‘He’s just got something to him and I felt working with him and knowing him, I was able to get into his soul and get deeper into him and a lot of my photographs I look at them and I find them amazing.’

Schatzberg, who has also directed several films starring Willie Nelson, Morgan Freeman, Faye Dunaway and Al Pacino, said that he and Dylan haven’t seen each other since they both were guests at a mutual friends wedding in the 1970s as both of their careers had moved into different directions and locations.   

Dylan By Schatzberg will go on sale in the United States on October 25 and can be purchased in the U.K. beginning on October 1.  

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk