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Bondi room with one bunk bed and one double advertised to be shared between three people

Australia’s housing crisis laid bare: Tiny room with a bunk bed bolted to the wall and one double bed to be shared between THREE people – and a ‘big dog’ – is advertised for $600 a week

  • Advertiser took to social media and online marketplace Gumtree to post the ad
  • Pictures showed the double bed on the ground with a bunk bed bolted above 
  • The room was advertised for $500 for two people or $600 for three people
  • Room is one of several cramped Bondi spaces recently advertised on internet 

A man looking for flatmates has offered a less than stellar room with a bunk bed bolted to the wall and one double to be shared between three people for $600 a week.  

The advertiser took to social media groups and Gumtree this week to spruik the room within his three-bedroom apartment at Bondi in Sydney’s ritzy east. 

‘Private room available in the best location! In amongst all the main shops, cafes, banks and post office, while only a couple minutes walk to the beach – it’s the ideal location to enjoy the best of Bondi,’ the posts read. 

He said tenants would have access to a ‘small but well equipped gym’ and would be sharing with a man from New Zealand, as well as a ‘big dog’. 

A man looking for flatmates has advertised a less than stellar apartment with a bunk bed bolted to the wall and one double to be shared between three people

The man took to online social media groups and Gumtree to advertise the apartment in Bondi

The man took to online social media groups and Gumtree to advertise the apartment in Bondi

Pictures of the underwhelming room showed a double bed on the ground with a bunk bed fixed to the wall above. 

Another picture showed the lounge room with two fans and a clothes rail in the middle of the room. 

The room was advertised for $500 for two people, or $600 for three people.

The advertiser said there was possibility for a discount in rent – or getting personal training sessions – in exchange for some ‘light cleaning duties’. 

The Facebook listing has since been taken down.

The Gumtree advertisement remains as it was originally posted. 

The man said there was possibility for a discount in rent - or getting PT [personal training] sessions - in exchange for some 'light cleaning duties'

The man said there was possibility for a discount in rent – or getting PT [personal training] sessions – in exchange for some ‘light cleaning duties’

He said tenants would be sharing with a man from New Zealand and a big dog

He said tenants would be sharing with a man from New Zealand and a big dog

Another picture showed the lounge room with two fans and a clothes rail in the middle of the room

Another picture showed the lounge room with two fans and a clothes rail in the middle of the room

The room is just one of several cramped Bondi spaces recently advertised on the internet.

A previously vacant bedroom with an asking price of $300 a week shows a double bed almost touching all the parameters of the narrow space. 

The vacancy was posted to a local marketplace Facebook page by two backpackers, who said the space was better value for money than the average Sydney city hostel.

Cash-strapped renters criticised the offer and labelled the room as a ‘prison cell’ with one saying the room was ‘everything that’s wrong with Sydney real estate in one photo’.  

Meanwhile, another vacant bedroom (pictured) with an asking price of $300 a week shows a double bed almost touching all the parameters of the narrow space

Meanwhile, another vacant bedroom (pictured) with an asking price of $300 a week shows a double bed almost touching all the parameters of the narrow space

In yet another advertisement, a woman offered a room barely one-metre wide in her Bondi apartment for $200 a week.

The advert, posted on Facebook, said the offer came with a wardrobe near the bathroom and a big box to fit shoes close to the narrow room.   

The vacancy was slammed by some as an ‘April fools joke’. 

In another advertisement, one woman advertised a room barely one metre wide in her Bondi apartment for $200 a week

In another advertisement, one woman advertised a room barely one metre wide in her Bondi apartment for $200 a week

The advert, posted on Facebook, said the offer came with a wardrobe near the bathroom and a big box to fit shoes close to the narrow room

The advert, posted on Facebook, said the offer came with a wardrobe near the bathroom and a big box to fit shoes close to the narrow room

Another landlord posted on a Bondi Facebook group offering prospective tenants to sleep on one of three single mattresses for $200 a week in a tiny studio apartment.

The room was being offered for $600 a week or $200 per bed, and was advertised as large and fully-furnished. 

Group members expressed their outrage at the ad, with one asking if the offer was even legal. 

One said he couldn’t live in the ‘clutter box’ even if the location was ‘right next door to the Queen of England’.                    

Another advertisement was posted on a Bondi Facebook group offering prospective tenants to sleep on one of three single mattresses for $200 a week in a tiny studio apartment

Another advertisement was posted on a Bondi Facebook group offering prospective tenants to sleep on one of three single mattresses for $200 a week in a tiny studio apartment

The room was being offered for $600 a week or $200 per bed, and is advertised as large and fully-furnished and pictured is the third single mattress up for grabs

The room was being offered for $600 a week or $200 per bed, and is advertised as large and fully-furnished and pictured is the third single mattress up for grabs

Australia’s ‘broken’ housing market  

Low-income Australians have fewer affordable rental homes available to them than a year ago, according to analysis by Anglicare.

The decline in affordable housing has prompted the organisation to declare that housing in Australia is ‘broken’.

‘There is a huge shortage of secure, affordable rentals,’ Anglicare Australia executive director Kasy Chambers said.

‘That’s causing record levels of rental stress and even homelessness.’

The advocacy group surveyed private rental properties available across Australia earlier this year, more than 69,000 in total.

It found that only one property would be affordable for a single person receiving either the Newstart or Youth Allowance welfare payments.

Only 317 of the homes – or 0.5 per cent – would be affordable for a single person receiving the disability support pension, compared to 0.72 per cent of rental housing being available for the group last year.

For a couple both living on the Newstart Allowance with two children, 777 of the homes would be affordable – or 1.1 per cent – compared to 1.63 per cent of homes being affordable in 2018.

Ms Chambers said the annual survey shows rental affordability is down ‘across the board’ and has appealed to both sides of politics to invest more in social housing.

There is a shortfall of about 300,000 for such dwellings, which are aimed at people on very low incomes.

‘People on the lowest incomes are being squeezed out of the rental market,’ Ms Chambers said.

‘We’re calling on all parties to commit to ending this shortfall – and ensure that everyone has a place to call home.’

The report defines affordable housing as properties where the rent is not more than 30 per cent of a household budget, a nationally-accepted benchmark for many years.

The government said in March that more affordable housing will soon be available to some struggling Australians, with a federal agency offering community housing providers $315 million worth of loans at cheaper-than-average rates.

The National Housing Finance and Investment Corporation – an independent government authority established in July last year – raised the money through its first issue of bonds.

The corporation was set up to provide long-term, low-cost finance to support more affordable rental housing in Australia.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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