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Boston man sues Uber for $63 million after he’s left quadriplegic following crash into parked car

Boston man sues Uber for $63 million after he was left quadriplegic when driver crashed into a parked car

  • Will Good, 31, filed a $63 million negligence suit seeking to hold Uber accountable for his injuries and for its ‘unsafe business practices’
  • Good’s suit claims that his Uber driver had a spotty driving history dating back to 1996, that included multiple moving violations, crashes, at least 20 citations
  • The suit argues Uber’s failure to screen the driver put others in jeopardy and therefore the company bears responsibility for Good’s ‘life-changing injuries’ 


A Boston man has sued Uber for $63 million after he was left a quadriplegic when his ‘dangerous’  driver with a checkered driving record crashed into a parked car last spring.   

Will Good, 31, filed a $63 million negligence suit against the rideshare company seeking to hold Uber accountable for his injuries and for its ‘unsafe business practices that endanger all driver in Massachusetts,’ according to the suit, which was filed Tuesday.  

On April 30, 2021, Good, a 30-year-old chef from Sommerville, called an Uber to go home from his restaurant job when he felt the vehicle swerve before it crashed into a parked car, according to his attorneys. 

Will Good, 31, was left paralyzed after Uber he had taken crashed into parked car

Will Good, 31,  (pictured before accident) filed a $63 million negligence suit seeking to hold Uber accountable for injuries that left him paralyzed and for its 'unsafe business practices'

Will Good, 31,  (pictured before accident) filed a $63 million negligence suit seeking to hold Uber accountable for injuries that left him paralyzed and for its ‘unsafe business practices’

The suit argues Uber's failure to screen the driver put others in jeopardy and therefore the company bears responsibility for Good's 'life-changing injuries'

The suit argues Uber’s failure to screen the driver put others in jeopardy and therefore the company bears responsibility for Good’s ‘life-changing injuries’

Good said he instantly knew he couldn’t move, and believed he had broken his neck but the unnamed Uber driver, ‘in a shocking display of poor judgment and poor training’ allegedly asked Good to get up, insisting he was not injured, the 31-year-old’s attorneys claim. 

Good’s suit claims that his Uber driver had a spotty driving history dating back to 1996, that included multiple moving violations, crashes, at least 20 citations, and state imposed driver retraining, the Boston Globe reported. 

Good’s lawyers are arguing that the rideshare giant, which is valued at around $70 billion, failed to screen the risky driver and put others in jeopardy – and therefore the company bears responsibility for Good’s ‘life-changing injuries.’ 

‘The consuming passenger here in Massachusetts is led to believe that Uber is in the business of vetting, screening, and holding its drivers to certain standards, when in fact, that’s really not true in many, many cases and that leads directly to what happened here.’ Good’s lawyer, Victoria Santoro Mair, of Sweeney Merrigan Law, told the Globe.

‘Now we have a 31-year-old man who had a life, and a career, that’s been completely derailed, completely ruined.’

Good, who was left quadriplegic after the accident, spent two months in the ICU at Massachusetts General Hospital, and another two months in a rehab center.  

Now living at home with his girlfriend and two caretakers, he is adjusting to a new reality.

‘I don’t like the taste of feeling sorry for myself,  so I try to fill my time with things instead of depression, but it hit when I got home, when I was alone,’ Good told the Globe. 

Good’s attorneys say they want his case to be used as a catalyst for Uber and other rideshare companies to be further regulated and held to higher safety standards.

‘The product Uber is selling is the driving,’ Santoro Mair told the Globe. ‘They can’t simply say, ‘well, you know, our business model is to draw the passengers into the car and charge them when they get out and then take no responsibility for what happens while they’re in the car.” 

An Uber spokesperson told DailyMail.com they are unable to comment due to pending litigation.

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk